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yard weed with cotton like seeds

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. “WOW What a Ride!!” -Mark Frost

My only guess with this photo is thistles.

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org

Oh, and every one of those cute little pieces of white fluff can become a new plant. Whatever your weed is, you need to eliminate it as quickly as possible to prevent the spread by seeds and by underground. I’m sure your neighbors will thank you.

Could you get a little closer and take a couple more photos? Do you remember seeing flowers?

Try to dig out this fast-growing grass as soon as you see it in your garden, being sure to dig up the entirety of the plant (including the roots). Dispose of in your waste bin rather than the compost pile, as it will likely continue to grow in the latter!

How to Control Nutsedge

Noxious Weeds:

Bindweed is NOT the same as the ornamental annual morning-glory (in the genus Ipomea) which has a larger (2-inch wide) and more showy flower that can be white to blue or purple; it also has a thicker stem that is sometimes hairy and heart-shaped leaves that are 1 ½ inches wide and 2 inches or more long. The two species are easy to distinguish from each other.

Yes, this weed is edible, especially when the leaves are young and tender. Enjoy it raw, steamed, boiled, or sauteed.

The best control strategy for weeds is always prevention. Before resorting to herbicides, look first to nonchemical weed control methods. Why? Herbicides may be a quick fix this year but will not keep your weed problem from recurring year after year. Only taking preventitive controls will reduce the weed problem in the future.