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who invented weed without seeds

Today, marijuana users are spoiled by a combination of easy access and extremely high-quality bud. Past generations relied on low-grade schwag illegally smuggled into the country. Today’s cannabis consumers can walk into a dispensary and buy the best weed they can afford.

When we discuss potency, we are talking about the level of THC in the plant. One possible reason for this increase could be that people didn’t know how to store cannabis well years ago. When the herb is improperly stored, its THC degrades.

Most of the marijuana smuggled into Europe and North America came from India, Pakistan, Mexico, Thailand, Colombia, and Jamaica. The vast majority of this weed was full of seeds making for a harsh smoking experience and relatively low THC.

When Did We First Gain Access to Sinsemilla?

Surprisingly few people seem to know what sinsemilla actually is. One school of thought suggests it relates to high-quality seedless marijuana tended to with extreme levels of care. Other people believe sinsemillas are potent strains from the Southwest of the U.S. or Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

It was only in the 1970s that seedless marijuana became better known. Breeders soon realized that this ‘sinsemilla’ weed was of significantly better quality, and it soon became the ‘gold standard.’

It is now so easy to grow high-quality marijuana that users are becoming picky. High THC strains are common, so it is now a question of finding weed with the right aroma and taste. It is marijuana’s aromatic terpene compounds that are mainly responsible for their flavors and scents.

Even so, the old-school Mexican brick, filled with seeds, has been replaced by the high-quality marijuana we call ‘sinsemilla.’

But the real breakthrough with growing sinsemilla came with the invention of feminized cannabis seeds in the 1990s. Previously, when growing from regular seeds, growers would need to cull the males as soon as possible. Feminized seeds did away with this concern, allowing growers to cultivate female plants only. The issue of seedy buds soon became a thing of the past. As a result, the term sinsemilla has lost some of its relevance in the modern day.

The word sinsemilla comes from the Spanish words “sin” (“without”) and “semilla” (“seed”), so it literally translates to “without seeds”. Contrary to what some may think, sinsemilla cannabis does not refer to a specific strain, subtype, or geographic location. The word is simply used to describe seedless cannabis flowers that come from unfertilised female plants.

If you love cannabis, you’ve probably come across the word sinsemilla. Is sinsemilla some special kind of cannabis? Where does it come from? Read on to find out!

IS SINSEMILLA INDICA OR SATIVA?

A little later, when indoor cultivation became popular, the separation of male and female cannabis plants became even easier and more commonplace. Growers could simply keep each in a separate grow room or tent to limit the risk of accidental pollination.

In the past, long before cannabis cultivation in the West was established, cannabis and hash were almost exclusively imported. Dried flowers usually came from Mexico, where cannabis was grown in the wild without the care and tech of today’s grow operations. A lot of the imported “grass” had plenty of seeds in it, so it wasn’t really what one would consider quality bud.

Sinsemilla, as we explained, just describes bud without seeds. The word can be used for any type of female cannabis plant that wasn’t fertilised, regardless of the strain. As such, sinsemilla can be either indica or sativa.

If you’re interested in cannabis and cannabis culture (and we have an inkling you may well be…), chances are you’ve come across the word “sinsemilla”. Interestingly enough, there is some confusion among people as to what sinsemilla really means.