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what to do with seeds in weed

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

Feminized cannabis seeds will produce only female plants for getting buds, so there is no need to remove males or worry about female plants getting pollinated. Feminized seeds are produced by causing the monoecious condition in a female cannabis plant—the resulting seeds are nearly identical to the self-pollinated female parent, as only one set of genes is present.

Also, autoflower plants are small—perfect for closet grows or any small grow, or growing outdoors where you don’t want your neighbors to see what you’re up to.

Is the seed viable?

Most experienced or commercial growers will not use feminized seeds because they only contain one set of genes, and these should never be used for breeding purposes. However, a lot of beginning growers start with feminized seeds because they eliminate the worry of having to deal with male plants.

Pre-flowers can initially be extremely small and hard to identify with the naked eye, but you can use a magnifying glass to get a better look.

Germinating cannabis seeds doesn’t always go as planned. Some seeds will be duds. Others will be slow and take longer to sprout. But some will pop quickly and grow rapidly.

Check out Johanna’s full video series on how to grow weed on Leafly’s YouTube .

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

What causes seeds?

There’s a seed in my bud!

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.