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what goes first weed and feed or grass seed

Post emergent herbicides kill weeds after they appear. Some post-emergent, systemic herbicides that you can apply directly on lawns only kill weedy grasses, while others only kill weeds with broadleaf weeds. Contact herbicide such as those including the active ingredient glyphosate kills on contact. To use one of those on a lawn without killing the grass you have to daub it on individual weeds.

Fertilizers containing pre-emergent herbicides selectively prevent certain kinds of weeds from finishing their germination cycle. There is no point applying this type of weed-and-feed mix after weeds are growing on your lawn. You have to apply it early in the growing season before weeds appear. Make sure the pre-emergent herbicide in the fertilizer kills the kind of weeds that have plagued your lawn in the past. You might apply a starter fertilizer containing a pre-emergent herbicide before you sow your lawn seeds.

You apply pre-emergent herbicides before weed seeds germinate, typically in the spring. Pre-emergent herbicides do not prevent weed seeds from germinating; they suppress the development of weed roots as they germinate. They’re usually effective for two weeks to three months, depending on the formulation, and you have to water the lawn after applying for the herbicide for it to be effective. There are pre-emergent herbicides to kill both broadleaf weeds and weedy grasses. You can apply them before you sow your grass seed. If you apply a pre-emergent herbicide that kills weedy grasses, you have to delay sowing your lawn seed.

Post-Emergent Herbicides

You can sow grass seeds now and kill weeds later with a post-emergent herbicide or kill weeds now with a pre-emergent herbicide and plant the seeds later. Weed-and-feed fertilizers are specially formulated combinations of turf fertilizer and herbicides that you apply either before you plant grass seeds or on established lawns.

Post-emergent weed-and-feed formulations kill selective weeds that are already growing in your lawn. Make sure that the herbicide in the formulation you buy kills the type of weeds that are growing in your lawn. Most weeds make their appearance in the spring, the best time to apply weed-and-feed fertilizer.

Ideally, you should plant seeds well enough before frost in the autumn so that the new grass will grow for several weeks before sleep. You can also sow grass seed in the early spring, though if you do so you should hold off on applying weaving feet for at least four to eight weeks to ensure it doesn’t damage the young grass.

Weed and feed products work by preventing new growth, effectively stopping weed seeds from sprouting and newly sprouted wheat from flourishing. However, the herbicides used are insufficient to target weeds only; grass grains and any new grass growth are the same.

It can take up to four weeks for the herbicide effective to fade, so sowing grass soon after applying weed and feed is likely futile because new grass won’t be able to grow.

When To Sow Seed

If you must sow grass seed after applying weed and feed, wait for at least four to six weeks before doing so to ensure the herbicide won’t prevent the seeds from sprouting. Prepare seedbeds with the help of a rake which is one of the important garden tools that every gardener should have. It helps the seeds to have proper contact with the ground and prevents any bare patches.

In order to activate, most weed and feed products are granular and should be applied to moist grass. Mow 2 – 4 days in advance and use the weed and feed products for best results, without additional rain for at least 48 hours. After application, do not mow the treated grass for at least 7 days to allow the herbicide time to work.

Weed and feed products, as the name implies, contain both a fertilizer and a herbicide to control weeds while feeding the surrounding grass. If the lawn has grass that is already established, this works well. The product should ideally be applied just a couple of weeks after the final frost when grass and weeds grow visibly because it is not effective for sleeping weeds. Apply it periodically throughout the rest of the year as well to keep weeds under control.

A plan weed and feed product to your lawn may seem like a perfect way to kill two birds with one stone. Not only are you can to get eliminate irritating weeds however the chemical contained within the product additionally can facilitate the grass to thrive. Weed and feed products aren’t ideal for all situations though and may cause some problems if you plan to receive the lawn soon after their application.

Without knowing where your soil stands, well-intended soil amendments and fertilizers can harm grass instead of help — or simply go to waste. Incorporating your specific soil lab recommendations helps circumvent potential problems and unnecessary setbacks. That’s one reason turf professionals emphasize regular soil testing to start seed right and keep lawns healthy and vibrant. Your local county extension office can help with testing kits and lab referrals.

Many homeowners think lime is a lawn care necessity, but that doesn’t hold true across the board. Normal lawn care can naturally cause soil pH to drop lower over time, and lime applications benefit lawns that need pH raised. But in some cases, soil pH may already be high. Using too much lime or applying it unnecessarily can be as damaging as failing to add lime when it’s needed.

2. Skipping the soil test and recommendations

Always read and follow herbicide and fertilizer labels, especially the instructions for use on newly seeded lawns and your grass type. As a general rule, avoid pre-emergent weed treatments at least 10 to 12 weeks before seeding — or longer for some products. After planting, reserve broad-spectrum weed treatments until new lawns have been mowed at least two to three times; for fall-planted seed, that usually means spring.

When soil test results show your lawn’s soil pH is below levels needed for optimal grass health, liming in accordance with recommendations restores proper pH balance, increases nutrient availability and helps keep lawns green. While many lime products are slow to work, products such as Pennington Fast Acting Lime speed up the process and start working immediately.

Even with similar seed types, all grass seed isn’t equal. Learn what’s actually inside the seed bags you or your lawn professional buy. By understanding the seed tags on grass seed products, you can be sure you invest in quality seed. Cheaper price tags can mean less seed versus fillers, old seeds past their prime, more weed seeds and lower germination rates. Getting seed right from the start benefits your lawn and budget.