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what dies it mean if weed has seeds

Popularized and marketed extensively by Dutch seed companies, feminized seeds produce female plants more than 99% of the time. Growers that use feminized seeds should still check to make sure no male plants have sprouted. Any variety of cannabis can be manipulated to make it feminized.

If you seek the best place to buy marijuana seeds, a couple options exist. Seeds are sold in brick-and-mortar locations legally in many countries across Europe, and are often traded online. As cannabis legalization expands in North America, more retail locations are carrying seeds as well. Feminized seeds are the most popular through market demand, but providers likely have access to mixed male and female seeds of any variety found feminized. Carefully sifting through cannabis before using the grinder will assure finding bagseeds before they are ground up. Professionally sourced seeds assure quality genetics and viability, but bagseeds are a great, cheap source of cannabis genetics for the hobbyist grower.

Marijuana seeds can be feminized by two different methods : chemical ethylene inhibition, and rodelization. In the first method, a chemical agent (colloidal silver, gibberellic acid, etc.) is applied to the plant to inhibit its production of ethylene, a plant hormone that induces female flower production. Rodelization is a less-used technique that involves exploiting a natural self-defense mechanism of the plant. An unpollinated female cannabis plant with fully mature flowers may, in some cases, grow pollen sacs to fertilize itself to ensure its propagation. In both cases, pollen is collected and used to fertilize other female plants. Given the absence of Y chromosomes, seeds that result from the mature buds are female.

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Plants grown from seed develop stronger root structures.

A pack of marijuana seeds—typically containing around 10 or so seeds—will run you anywhere from around $40 on the low end and as much as $400 or $500 on the upper end. The price of marijuana seeds depends on a number of variables including:

Cannabis seed production begins with the pollen grain of a male plant. From this grain, a pollen tube grows, producing male generative cells that disperse in the form of pollen. The migration of pollen into a female plant ovule triggers pistils to fall off and seed production to begin. The bracts, which contain the ovule, will then fill with seeds.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

There’s a seed in my bud!

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Are seeds good to grow?

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

It should be dark and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds, that can be easily crushed between the fingers, usually won’t sprout. However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding them for hard seeds after all) so when in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts!