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weed that has stems that has seeds in them

Check out the difference between the bud grown by Grobo and what is on the market to purchase.

This doesn’t mean it is bad for your health but we advise against smoking seeds. Please remove them as you see them – you may find them crushed up in your grinder! The presence of seeds does mean that the total mass of smokable weed is compromised with decreased cannabinoid content and quite a few unwanted seeds. Think about it this way: If you purchase an ounce of cannabis and it comes filled with seeds, you are paying for the seeds which are less desirable than the cannabis flower that you were expecting.

If you’re going to try growing with seeds, check on their viability first. Seeds that are dark in color are best. Whole dark, mottled seeds are mature and ready to plant, but the lighter, softer or cracked seeds are not as viable for successful germination . The image below is an example of healthy looking cannabis seeds that should be viable.

Before You Buy

The other option is that the plant has self pollinated. This is rare but that still does happen. This self pollination usually happens when the plant is stressed while undergoing the budding phase but sometimes it can manifest because of genetics or light leak during necessary dark times. This is often referred to as a hermaphrodite plant.

When you purchase your weed from a qualified vendor you’ll have the opportunity to smell it, feel it and to walk away knowing that you didn’t get a seedy deal. All of this will make your monetary investment well worth every dollar, as you will achieve the quantity and quality you are looking for.

That said, visual cues might not be enough to evaluate your weed 100% but it can help you to conduct at best a preliminary inspection before you buy.

I found 1-3 seeds in my weed We do not suggest growing with these seeds as they come from a stressed genetic background ( hermaphrodite plant).

For a Northern, cool-season lawn (one composed of cool-season grasses like rye, fescue and/or bluegrass) that means never cutting shorter than three inches, never feeding in summer, watering deeply but infrequently, and giving the lawn a big natural feeding in the Fall.

If I’m paying attention and life cooperates, I’ll pull the weeds while they’re still in flower and before they set seed. Both weeds get composted—mixed into a good amount of shredded leaves hoarded from the previous fall; at least two parts leaves to every part green weed. The bitter cress typically comes up with a good amount of soil attached to its roots, which adds microbial life to the pile; and the chickweed has a lot of water content to help keep the moistness levels right.

Both weeds are also highly edible, especially when young. Chickweed is more nutritious than the salad greens that many people remove it to plant! And, although hairy bittercress (a member of the mustard family) doesn’t have nearly as many wild food fans as chickweed or purslane (perhaps the most edible ‘weed’), it does have some of the peppery taste of its namesake watercress, and it’s loaded with cancer-fighting nutrients. Pick it before the flower buds form and it won’t have nearly as much of the bitter edge that older plants take on. (Flowering changes the flavor of virtually all herbs and greens for the worse.)

But I like to wait until after the little white flowers form to pull these weeds. Their flowers open up right before the blooms on my fruit trees, attracting lots of the pollinators and beneficial insects I’ll need to get a good fruit set and to fight all the pests that want to eat those peaches as much as we do.

If you scalp the lawn, weeds will thrive. If you water it frequently for short periods of time, weeds will thrive. And if you feed the poor heat-stressed thing in summer, weeds will take over.

In turf, weeds like bittercress are a sure sign of poor lawn care. The answer is not to poison yourself and the environment (and kill your grass) in a futile attempt to remove the weed, but to care for your lawn correctly and deny the weed a place to live. Take good care of your grass and a harmless little plant like this should never have a chance to get established, much less thrive.

If I don’t get to them in time, I toast the seedheads with my trusty flame weeder before I pull the plants, just like I do with dandelions that have progressed to the puffball stage. Dandelion seeds burst into little flares of color—like Munchkin fireworks. Bittercress seeds explode with a loud ‘pop’. (Organic gardening is SO much more fun than spraying hormonal disruptor around!)