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weed seed loss key

At the Jost farm, they follow BroadAxe XC with Prefix ® herbicide as the post-emergent residual, plus tank-mixed dicamba and glyphosate partners. The two effective sites of action in Prefix provide five weeks of residual activity to inhibit weed emergence and growth while preserving available sites of action to prevent multistacked resistance.

“They think they’re saving money; but by the time they do reactive applications to clean up what the other stuff missed, they’ve actually spent more money on herbicides and didn’t raise as much yield to go along with it,” he says. “They take a double hit.”

Protecting Soybeans

For burndown plus residual, Jost uses BroadAxe ® XC herbicide on his dicamba-tolerant soybeans, with glyphosate or another broadleaf weed herbicide at planting. BroadAxe XC delivers excellent residual control of weeds, including the more evasive species, such as Russian thistle, morningglory and kochia.

“It’s easier to control a seed than a weed,” Binns says. “So just missing the window and delaying that application can take you from a proactive approach to a reactive approach.”

Another option for dicamba-resistant beans is following BroadAxe XC or Prefix with Tavium ® Plus VaporGrip ® Technology herbicide, a premix of dicamba and S-metolachlor that controls both preemergent and post-emergent weeds for up to three weeks longer than dicamba alone. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s recent decision to extend the registration of Tavium on dicamba-tolerant soybeans and cotton, growers will have access to this valuable chemistry in 2021.

Bill Johnson, Ph.D., professor of weed science at Purdue University, says getting a jump on weeds is the only hope a farmer has of really controlling them, especially considering the speed with which they can become resistant.

All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and intellectual contribution to the work, and approved it for publication.

Important parameters that influence weed seeds' germination and seedlings' emergence can also affect the efficacy of false seedbed as weed management practice. These parameters consist of environmental factors such as soil temperature, soil water potential, exposure to light, fluctuating temperatures, nitrates concentration, soil pH, and the gaseous environment of the soil. Soil temperature and soil water potential can exert a great influence on composition of the weed flora of a cultivated area. Base soil temperatures and base water potential for germination vary among different weed species and their values can possibly be used to predict which weeds will emerge in a field as well as the timing of emergence. Predicting the main flush of weeds in the field could maximize the efficacy of false seedbed technique as weed management practice. Timing, depth, and type of tillage are important factors affecting weed emergence and, subsequently, the efficacy of false seedbed. The importance of shallow tillage as a weed control method in the false seedbed technique has been highlighted. Further research is needed to understand and explain all the factors that can affect weed emergence so as to maximize the effectiveness of eco-friendly weed management practices such as false seedbed in different soils and under various climatic conditions.

Germination speed of Alopecurus myosuroides (Huds.) seeds decreased with temperature, whereas the final proportion of germinated seeds was not significantly influenced (Colbach et al., 2002b). Minimum temperature required for seed germination is different for various weed species. Minimum temperature required for seed germination has been estimated at 0°C both for the winter annual A. myosuroides (Colbach et al., 2002a) and the summer annual P. aviculare (Batlla and Benech-Arnold, 2005). However, Masin et al. (2005) estimated the base temperature for Digitaria sanguinalis (L.), Setaria viridis (L.), P. Beauv., Setaria pumila (Poir.), Roem. & Schultes and Eleusine indica (L.), at 8.4, 6.1, 8.3, and 12.6°C, respectively. Moreover, the mean Tb recorded for summer annuals Amaranthus albus (L), Amaranthus palmeri (S. Wats.), D. sanguinalis, Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv., Portulaca oleracea (L.), and Setaria glauca (L.) was ~40% higher as compared to the corresponding value recorded for winter annuals Hirschfeldia incana (L.) and Sonchus oleraceus (L.). Optimal temperature conditions required for terminating dormancy status vary among different species. For example, Panicum miliaceum (L.) seeds lost dormancy at 8°C while P. aviculare seeds were released from dormancy at 17°C (Batlla and Benech-Arnold, 2005). The two germination response characteristics, Tb and rate, influence a species' germination behavior in the field (Steinmaus et al., 2000). Extended models should be developed to predict the effects of environment and agricultural practices on weed germination, weed emergence, and the dynamics of weed communities in the long term. This requires estimating the baseline temperature for germination for each weed species that are dominant in a cultivated area and recording seed germination in a wide range of temperatures (Gardarin et al., 2010).

Author Contributions

The knowledge about seed germination for the dominant weed species of a cultivated area is vital for predicting weed seedlings emergence. The possibility of predicting seedling emergence is essential for improving weed management decisions. However, weed emergence is the result of two distinct processes, i.e., germination and pre-emergence growth of shoots and roots, which react differently to environmental factors and should therefore be studied and modeled separately (Colbach et al., 2002a). In temperate regions, soil temperature is probably the most distinct and recognizable factor governing emergence (Forcella et al., 2000). Soil temperature can be used as a predictor of seedling emergence in crop growth models (Angus et al., 1981). Soil temperature can also be used for predicting weed emergence, but only if emergence can be represented by a simple continuous cumulative sigmoidal curve and the upper few centimeters of soil remain continuously moist (Forcella et al., 2000).

The effects of water deficits on seed germination have been encapsulated in the “hydrotime” concept. This idea was first illustrated by Gummerson (1986) and further explained by (Bradford, 1995). The model of (Bradford, 1995) accounted for dormancy loss during after-ripening through changes in the base water potential of the seeds' environment that permits 50% germination (Ψb(50)). Christensen et al. (1996) confirmed that Ψb(50) value of the population is decreased by the change in Ψb(50) due to after-ripening. The Ψb(50) value is saved as the Ψb(50) value of the population and serves as the initial value for the next time step. The process continues until the Ψb(50) value of fully after-ripened seeds is reached. The model described is only to consider dormancy changes, not only in relation to the thermal environment, but also as a function of the soil water status. The loss of primary dormancy does not secure some species germination if moisture demands are not met. For example, adequate water conditions are demanded to promote germination of Bromus tectorum (L.) (Bauer et al., 1998). Bauer et al. (1998) assumed that the temperature-dependent after-ripening process in this winter annual occurs at soil water potentials below ~-4 MPa. Martinez–Ghersa et al. (1997) reported that increased water content promoted seed germination of A. retroflexus, C. album, and E. cruss-galli.

Tillage events confined to the top 10 cm can provoke greater weed emergence than the corresponding events usually observed in untilled soil (Egley, 1989). Although no direct evidence exists of the effect of tillage on dormancy through modification of temperature fluctuations or nitrate concentration, it is well-known that tillage exposes seeds to a light flash before reburial, allows for greater diffusion of oxygen into and carbon dioxide out of the soil, buries residue, and promotes drying of the soil, thereby increasing the amplitude of temperature fluctuations and promoting nitrogen mineralization (Mohler, 1993). Tillage promotes seed germination, and this is a fundamental principle in which innovative management practices such as stale seedbed techniques that target the weed seed bank are based (Riemens et al., 2007). Weed emergence is an inevitable result of shallow soil disturbances in crop production, as it is indicated by Longchamps et al. (2012). Disturbances as small as wheel tracking can enhance seedling emergence. Results from past studies point out that promotion of seedling emergence is more dependent on the density of a given recruitment cohort rather than flush frequency (Myers et al., 2005; Schutte et al., 2013), and that the stimulatory effect of a particular shallow soil disturbance event dissipates over time and flushes occurring afterward feature seedling densities are similar to flushes recorded in untilled soils (Mulugeta and Stoltenberg, 1997; Chauhan et al., 2006). Plants react to the low fidelity between germination cues and recruitment potential and have become able to produce seed populations with different germination demands not only in qualitative but also in quantitative points to secure the longevity of the population. Thus, only a fraction of a population can germinate after performing shallow tillage operations (Childs et al., 2010). Soil type can also affect seedbank dynamics as it was shown by the results of a study conducted in Ohio. When the soil was sampled at 15 cm depth, the concentration of seeds was reduced with depth but the effect of tillage on seed depth was not the same for all three soil types that received the same tillage operation (Cardina et al., 1991).

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