Posted on

weed seed inhibitor

Product Features
• Prevents crabgrass, dandelion, and white clover seeds from germinating in residential lawns.
• Organic based, phosphate-free.
• Contains slow-release nitrogen for prolonged fertilization.
• Homogeneous for uniform distribution of nutrients.
• Gluten is a protein found in the periphery of the corn kernel that remains after removing the starch.
• All the potassium is in the safer sulphate form.

Caneberries benefit from higher-nutrient mulches such as composted manure. Dormant vegetable beds can use a six-inch blanket of manure and leaves. Rhubarb and asparagus beds do best covered with a mix of well-composted straw and manure.

A pre-emergent herbicide is one that kills seedlings as they germinate. Pre-emergent herbicides generally have to be applied and watered in before weed seeds germinate. Other herbicides, such as glyphosate (e.g. Round Up) kill plants after they have emerged.

It is not clear why the commercial version of corn gluten meal used in OSU trials was not effective, said Cook. One possibility is that the product as formulated for sale has a short shelf life and loses potency during manufacture, shipping and storage. Further research needs to be done to test this hypothesis, he said.

If you want to discourage weeds from germinating and growing in your garden beds over the winter, try adding mulch to soil surfaces. Use a minimum of three to six inches of composted material. Tuck mulch up to the shoulders of your perennials, but don’t cover the growing crown until freezing cold weather sets in. If you cover plant crowns too soon, they may begin to grow under the mulch and could be killed when temperatures dip.

“My overall impression has been that in turfgrass it provides a lot of nitrogen,” added Altland. “Thicker, denser turf from high nitrogen rates will reduce weed numbers alone, without the help of herbicides.

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Corn gluten meal is a natural substitute for a synthetic “pre-emergence” herbicide and has been advertised as a more environmentally friendly way to control weeds.

Avoid mulching with hay or with ryegrass straw. Their seeds will sprout to create an unnecessary headache for you in the spring. And don’t use grass clippings from a lawn treated with a weed-and-feed preparation. The herbicide in the clippings can damage your shrubs.