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weed has no seeds

Growing cannabis with seeds is beneficial for the natural evolution of the plant. Plants naturally evolved within their environment, picking up traits and characteristics that helped them better survive their environment.

“I only buy sinsemilla flower.”

A Spanish term meaning “seedless,” sinsemilla refers to cannabis grown without seeds. In the wild, cannabis grows seeds along with buds so when it dies, it will grow again the following year. Growing sinsemilla cannabis was adopted in the 1960s and ‘70s to produce buds without seeds for consumers, by only growing bud-producing female cannabis plants and not allowing them to get pollinated.

History of sinsemilla

Only female cannabis plants produce buds, so when they are pollinated, seeds grow with the buds. Sinsemilla, or “seedless” cannabis was grown to keep seeds out of female plants so they only produce buds. To grow sinsemilla cannabis, male plants are discard or moved away from females before they develop pollen sacs and can pollinate females. This allows female plants to focus their resources on bud production instead of seed production.

“Sinsemilla is the only way to grow premium cannabis.”

Cannabis can be male or female, and in the wild males pollinate females, which then produce seeds. The genetics of both male and female plants are passed down to the seeds, so that when a female plant dies—cannabis is an annual, growing and dying each year—it drops seeds, which grow into new plants the following spring.

Before sinsemilla became a standard practice among cultivators, there was a good chance weed you grew or bought had seeds in the buds. Bud with seeds are generally considered lower quality—seeds lead to a harsh smoke.

Truth was, of course, that it was still the same weed from the same strains. The only difference was in how it was cultivated. What’s more, this alleged new kind of powerful cannabis fuelled anti-cannabis propaganda, as weed suddenly became more “dangerous” in the eyes of the establishment.

It is thought that the word sinsemilla was coined in the 1970s, around the time when cultivation started ramping up in the US and Europe. Here it was used to differentiate seedless weed from the poorer stock. As the “new” weed was indeed better and more potent, this gave rise to the misconception of sinsemilla being a different, very strong variety of cannabis.

In the past, long before cannabis cultivation in the West was established, cannabis and hash were almost exclusively imported. Dried flowers usually came from Mexico, where cannabis was grown in the wild without the care and tech of today’s grow operations. A lot of the imported “grass” had plenty of seeds in it, so it wasn’t really what one would consider quality bud.

FEMINIZED CANNABIS: THE SINSEMILLA BREAKTHROUGH

Sinsemilla, as we explained, just describes bud without seeds. The word can be used for any type of female cannabis plant that wasn’t fertilised, regardless of the strain. As such, sinsemilla can be either indica or sativa.

But the real breakthrough with growing sinsemilla came with the invention of feminized cannabis seeds in the 1990s. Previously, when growing from regular seeds, growers would need to cull the males as soon as possible. Feminized seeds did away with this concern, allowing growers to cultivate female plants only. The issue of seedy buds soon became a thing of the past. As a result, the term sinsemilla has lost some of its relevance in the modern day.

The word sinsemilla comes from the Spanish words “sin” (“without”) and “semilla” (“seed”), so it literally translates to “without seeds”. Contrary to what some may think, sinsemilla cannabis does not refer to a specific strain, subtype, or geographic location. The word is simply used to describe seedless cannabis flowers that come from unfertilised female plants.

Of course. Less seeds means more flowers, more resin, more aroma, and more “oomph” when you’re smoking. The purpose of sinsemilla is to give folks the best cannabis experience. So yes, sinsemilla means it’s time to blaze!