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tall weeds with seed pods

If you’ve made it outside on a recent sunny day, you’ve probably noticed the abundance of flowers blooming in gardens, parks, forests, and throughout King County right now. Unfortunately, the noxious weeds are out there, too—many of them bolting, flowering, and even going to seed already.

First up, weeds already going to seed or getting close. Catch them now before seeds disperse!

Many garlic mustard plants in King County are going to seed. Note the long, skinny seed pods on this one.

1. Top priority: eradicate before seeds disperse

Below are some of the top regulated noxious weeds to keep an eye out for this month. Please let us know if you see one of these high-priority invasive plants, so we can make sure they’re controlled or eradicated in time! [Click here to go to the King County Noxious Weed List for the whole list!] Report locations and share photos with us easily on our new and improved Report a Weed online form.

Because its ability to spread quickly, pokeweed is considered an invasive and harmful weed. It can form dense bushes and overwhelm other plants. Plus, due to its toxicity, it’s a real threat for children, pets, and livestock.

Because it looks very similar to cow parsnip, a plant from the same family, these two are usually easily mistaken with each other. The difference between these two plants is that giant hogweed grows larger than cow parsnip, has sharper serrated leaves, and has purplish spots on the stalk.

3. Sunflower

The plant develops a single tall stem wich becomes more robust once with age. Depending on the variety, it can be sometimes covered with thin spines. The color of the stem usually varies from one species to another, and it can be greyish-green, green, purple, or brownish-red.

Despite its pleasant appearance, Ricinus is one of the most poisonous plants in the world. All its parts, especially the beans-like-seeds, contain a deadly naturally occurring toxin called “ricin.” Ricin can be lethal for both humans and animals.

Common Mullein by Ryan Hodnett / CC BY-SA