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starting weed seeds outdoors

Planting directly into the ground or a raised bed requires a bit more preparation, but has its benefits as well. Without a container to restrict growth, roots can grow deep and thick to support a strong plant. The added surface area also allows the plant to access a greater quantity of nutrients and water in the soil, compared with a container garden. The major downside is that the plants cannot be moved and could require additional structures to protect them in the case of extreme weather.

Outdoor cultivators utilize the best mother nature has to offer in hopes of producing the best possible harvest. Many cannabis users agree that the best marijuana they’ve ever experienced has been grown outdoors under the full spectrum of natural sunlight. That unique spectrum creates a greater variance of cannabinoids and terpenes than artificial lighting, while indoor grows are often aimed at producing higher levels of THC, in particular.

Some cannabis genetics have adapted to specific climates and are capable of growing more easily in certain conditions than others, so cultivators pay very close attention to the cultivars, more commonly referred to as strains, that they choose. A little research will go a long way in ensuring you have a successful harvest. While cultivars may vary, there are some general rules of thumb that will be useful no matter which cultivar you choose.

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Plants grown from seeds are typically heartier and more vigorous than clones, as they produce a sturdier taproot that clones are not able to replicate. The vigor that comes from deep roots can be an advantage when dealing with harsh environmental conditions and pest pressures. The disadvantages of growing seeds is the additional attention required to germinate the seedlings, the necessity to eliminate any males before they pollinate the females, and the high variability in growth characteristics that results from their genes.

If you decide to use seeds, make sure you start them about a month before you would typically start clones to give them time to germinate and adequately develop their taproot.

Cannabis requires more nutrients than many of the common plants you may have in your garden. Quality soil contains enough organic nutrients to start the growth cycle, but as your cannabis plant grows and transitions into flowering, it may deplete the available nutrients and require additional fertilizers.

There are many options when it comes to types of soil and how you can plant your cannabis plants outdoors.

Environmentally friendly

If you don’t have a suitable patch of earth to make a garden, containers can be placed on decks, patios, rooftops, and many other spots. If needed, you can move them around during the day to take advantage of the sun or to shield them from excessive heat or wind.

Climate in your area

We also advise against using nutrients designed for indoor weed growing—they are generally composed of synthetic mineral salts and can damage soil bacteria.

Garden plot: Probably the most common outdoor growing spot, many will plant cannabis alongside other growing veggies.

In hot climates, sandy soil should be mulched to help with water retention and to keep roots from getting too hot.