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purple weed with grass seed

The velvetleaf is a competitive weed for vegetables in your garden. It sucks water and nutrients from the soil, which can compromise the healthy, sustained growth of your plants. This summer annual also contains a chemical that inhibits the germination and growth of your plants. With the germination and growth of your desired vegetation stymied, velvetleaf is then able to establish a dense monoculture in that area.

A pre-emergent herbicide will suppress the germination of these weeds in your lawns and gardens. If mouse-ear chickweed has already appeared in your flower beds or gardens, a systemic herbicide like glyphosate will effectively kill the weed plants.

In lawns, ensuring that it is healthy and grows in a manner that outperforms the weed plant is the best way to prevent them from appearing. You can also mitigate an infestation by not mowing the grass too short and watering the lawn properly during dry periods.

Velvetleaf

If left unchecked, the mat formed by the leaves can smother other plants. The growth of this perennial lawn weed is vigorous, and there is the possibility that it could out-compete your desirable grass or plants. The daisy can be found in lawns, garden beds, and flower beds.

The major problem associated with the presence of wild violets around your lawn and garden is that it is hard to control their growth. In a fairly short time, these perennials can inundate your garden.

The virile growth of dandelions might out-compete the growth of your desirable grasses and plants. The seed head that rests upon the stalk is easily dispersed over great distances. If your turf is weakened or compromised, once the dandelion establishes its taproot, they become challenging to remove. It is nearly a guarantee that new plants will form if any portion of the taproot remains alive in the earth.

This perennial broadleaf weed is a member of the mint family and can be found in lawns and gardens with a wide variety of growing conditions. The selfheal has leaves that are oval with slightly scalloped edges. The surface of the leaves of this perennial weed can range from smooth to slightly hairy.

Unlike many weeds, dandelion is a perennial plant, and its tenacious long taproot makes it a difficult enemy to eradicate. But dandelions can be pulled by hand, and they can also be killed with vinegar if you want to avoid chemicals.

Common plantain (Plantago major) may take you back to your childhood. Did you have a pet bunny as a kid? What did you feed it? If you built a bottomless outdoor cage for your pet (with the cage resting directly on the ground, without legs), your bunny no doubt would eat the vegetation under him. Grass would have been on the menu, but another favorite dish would have been common plantain (if present). Common plantain is also edible by people and may be used in salads or as a cooked green.

Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea)

Wild violets are probably the best of the bunch in terms of appearance amongst the common lawn weeds featured here. In fact, some homeowners find the flowers sufficiently pretty that they decide to just leave the plants alone. Indeed, this relative of the Johnny-jump-up isn’t far inferior to Johnny in the looks department—and you won’t have to buy it. Violets may actually work very well if you want a naturalistic feel to your lawn.

For more environmentally friendly controls, you can simply to pull up the clover. Be aware, though that the presence of the clover in the first place indicates that your soil is lacking in nitrogen. If you remove the clover, you should add nitrogen in the form of compost or granular fertilizer. If entire patches of lawn are bare once the clover is removed, you should reseed these areas with turf grass. To prevent the reappearance of clover, keep these spots healthy and well-fed.

Yellow or “curly” dock is one of the easier plants listed here to identify. It has a distinctive dried flower head that resembles coffee grounds. A dock is a tall plant when mature, so you may not associate it with lawns, but seeds may well sprout up as tiny plants in your lawn, and especially along fence lines if you haven’t trimmed diligently.