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pesticide for weeds with a lot of seeds

A. Let’s start with the black plastic idea.

Corn of any kind would be especially ideal; ‘maize’ loves a Nitrogen-rich soil, and 15 by 30 would be a perfect size to seed a big patch and get lots of nice full ears. (I personally vote for popcorn—super-fun to grow!

Now: why did I say ‘weeds of almost any size’?

(I’ve always been emotionally satisfied by my flame weeders. [Mom said it was OK to be easy; just not cheap.])

Now—that would also put a lot of Nitrogen into the soil, so I would then use that area to grow a non-fruiting, but Nitrogen-hungry crop like sweet corn , field corn, popcorn, salad greens, potatoes, onions or other things I’m not thinking of right now.

The grant will fund a three-year project lead by Smith. UNH researchers will investigate the role pesticide seed treatments play in mediating weed population and community dynamics, identify likely mechanisms contributing to the impacts of such treatments on weeds and their natural enemies, and explore whether cover crops, coupled with additional integrated pest management tactics, can mitigate nontarget effects of pesticide seed treatments on weeds.

“We have data suggesting that the insecticides and fungicides coated on most corn and some soybean seeds, generally referred to as pesticide seed treatments, can exacerbate the weed challenges faced by farmers. We hypothesize that pesticide seed treatments protect weed seeds in the soil from attack by their invertebrate and fungal ‘natural enemies,’ and we have preliminary data supporting this,” Smith says.

Glyphosate-resistant weeds are a serious concern in many regions of the United States, and this has prompted many farmers to seek alternative ways of managing these weeds, including by enhancing populations of organisms that naturally kill weed seeds. “If pesticide seed treatments are facilitating the persistence of weed seeds in the soil by protecting them from attack by beneficial organisms, whether that be on farms in the Corn Belt or here in New Hampshire, that’s a problem we really need to figure out how to address,” Smith says.

“We also have data indicating that noncrop plants, such as cover crops, can take up significant quantities of residual pesticides from the soil, suggesting that strategic planting of cover crops could mitigate spill-over effects of pesticide seed treatments on weeds, including those resistant to glyphosate,” he says.

The grant was made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), with funding made possible through NIFA’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.