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organic jimson weed seeds

Sold out varieties will be restocked at the end of the growing season. All seed varieties are grown at our farm and/or locally wildcrafted by us. The seeds are hand-gathered and hand-processed in small batches each year. We will update the website as soon as the seeds are ready in the fall.

Sun/Soil
Full sun, well-drained soil.

Common Names
Jimson Weed, Jamestown Weed, Thorn Apple, Devil’s Apple, Angel Trumpets, Moon Flower, Toloache

Hardiness Zone
2-11

Growing/Care
Easy to grow. Plants are most impressive when given regular water and good garden soil. Will self seed and potentially become weedy unless deadheaded to prevent seed formation.

Datura stramonium is native to North America, but was spread to the Old World early. It was scientifically described and named by Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1753, although it had been described a century earlier by herbalists, such as Nicholas Culpeper.[13] Today, it grows wild in all the world’s warm and moderate regions, where it is found along roadsides and at dung-rich livestock enclosures. In Europe, it is found as a weed on wastelands and in garbage dumps.

The egg-shaped seed capsule is 3 to 8 cm (1–3 in) in diameter and either covered with spines or bald. At maturity, it splits into four chambers, each with dozens of small, black seeds.

Jimson weed Seeds or Devil’s snare (Datura stramonium)

Toxicity

The James-Town Weed (which resembles the Thorny Apple of Peru, and I take to be the plant so call’d) is supposed to be one of the greatest coolers in the world. This being an early plant, was gather’d very young for a boil’d salad, by some of the soldiers sent thither to quell the rebellion of Bacon (1676); and some of them ate plentifully of it, the effect of which was a very pleasant comedy, for they turned natural fools upon it for several days: one would blow up a feather in the air; another would dart straws at it with much fury; and another, stark naked, was sitting up in a corner like a monkey, grinning and making mows [grimaces] at them; a fourth would fondly kiss and paw his companions, and sneer in their faces with a countenance more antic than any in a Dutch droll.

The genus name is derived from the plant’s Hindi name धतूरा dhatūra. Stramonium is originally from Greek, strychnos στρύχνος “nightshade” and maniakos μανιακός “mad”.

Self-seeding annual native to North America, currently distributed worldwide. Flowers light blue or white on a purple stem. Direct seed in warm, sunny location, or start in greenhouse in flats or pots. Traditional usage external only (American Indian, TWM): motion sickness, rheumatic and glandular swellings. All parts of the plant are toxic–leaf, root, flower and seed. This plant must never be ingested! Plant prefers full sun and dryish soils. Sow in warm soil, keep moist, and if germination does not occur within a week or two, allow the flat to dry out, which often spurs germination. The seeds are very wild, and can remain in the seed bank for many years and germinate when conditions are right (sunlight, dry and warm). Space plants 3 feet apart.