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my seed was white will it grow weed

Apart from the white weed seeds we want to go a little deeper into white weed species.

White weed seeds do not always occur because of a genetic trait, such as albinism. Instead, it can occur as a side effect of cross-breeding strains. Despite their color, white weeds seeds sold by seed banks are entirely healthy and develop in a normal way, offering bountiful harvests if grown in the right conditions. They are not true albino plants, and it is unlikely that albino plants would survive long enough to produce cannabis. Watch out if a strain of weed starts to turn white as this can be a sign of powdery mildew.

The short answer is ‘yes’. Most cannabis seeds are dark brown, but some are a silvery white and grow into beautiful plants with frosted white buds and even leaves that are laced with white.

Do white cannabis seeds grow?

The white color in cannabis occurs in nature occasionally, as a consequence of a double recessive gene responsible for the absence of chlorophyll or because of a genetic mutation of the genes involved in pigmentation.

A double recessive gene causes absolutely white plants, although this is extremely rare; and in the second case, the bud or a part of the plant is affected by the mutation. Another possible explanation is the non-conformity between nuclear and chloroplast genomes.

Chlorophyll is the pigment responsible for giving color to plants. Its purpose, however, is more than aesthetic, as it is vital for the photosynthesis process. The chlorophyll of marijuana leaves is responsible for absorbing sunlight, triggering the chemical reaction that enables the plant to generate energy from carbon dioxide (CO₂) and the raw sap derived from water and mineral salts.

White Widow is widely regarded as the queen of the ‘White’ family. She has often been used to form other ‘white strains’ or share genetic material with other ‘white’ varieties. Other denominators are that white strains are covered in trichomes, have a high THC level resulting in a powerful high. Popular white strains include Snow White, White Widow and Amnesia Haze x White Widow.

Autoflowering strains require some preparation, as they will grow quickly and start to flower whether or not you’re ready for them.

You can also minimize headaches and avoid the hassle of seed germination and sexing plants by starting with clones.

Climate considerations

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

Finding a cannabis seed in your stash is not ideal, but we’ve all been there before. Although much less common than it once was, it still happens. Sometimes you’ll notice one when grinding down some flower, or you’ll see one pop, spark, and crackle from the heat of a lit bowl.

Autoflowers can be started in early spring and will flower during the longest days of summer, taking advantage of high quality light to get bigger yields. Or, if you get a late start in the growing season, you can start autoflowers in May or June and harvest in the fall.

Some smokers might be pleased to see some cannabis seeds in their bag, and might think themselves lucky. However, finding seeds in a bag is bad for various reasons. For one, this means the grower has messed up and allowed their female plants to be pollinated by an invading male. When flowers are pollinated, they stop producing THC-containing resin and divert their energy toward producing seeds. Secondly, the seeds will have added to the overall weight of the bag, which means less weed for your buck.

Mature cannabis seeds usually have a hard outer shell that can vary in color from very dark (or almost black) to very light grey and may have tiger-like stripes. You should be able to firmly press these seeds between your fingers without damaging them.

With this said, you may get lucky if the strain they were growing really is prime. In this case, it’s worth carrying out the following test to see if it’s worth germinating.

Germinating All Your Seeds Regardless

Keep in mind that the simple process of packaging and storing cannabis seeds can also affect their appearance. Abrupt changes in humidity, temperature, or light exposure can make some seeds appear darker or lighter than others, but ultimately have no effect on their quality.

Immature cannabis seeds, on the other hand, tend to be green and have a soft outer shell that breaks when any kind of pressure is applied to it.

We hear this question all the time from clients and beginner growers, and the answer is a resounding no. There is simply no way to tell the sex of a cannabis seed just by looking at it.

The one true method to test the genetic potential of a seed is to simply put it in the soil. It won’t take too long to see the results. This option is best for the hobby home grower who has time and space to spare for a risky project. Growers cultivating cannabis for commercial use likely don’t have the excess time to invest.