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jimson weed seed dose

Stomach and intestinal infections: Jimson weed might slow down the emptying of the stomach and intestines. As a result, “bad” bacteria and the toxins they produce could remain in the digestive tract longer than usual. This could make infections caused by these bacteria worse.

Germond-Burquier, V., Narring, F., and Broers, B. [Intentional datura stramonium intoxication and circumstances of use in two adolescents]. Presse Med. 2008;37(6 Pt 1):982-985. View abstract.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Jimson weed contains chemicals that cause a drying effect. It also affects the brain and heart. Drying medications called anticholinergic drugs can also cause these effects. Taking jimson weed and drying medications together might cause side effects including dry skin, dizziness, low blood pressure, fast heartbeat, and other serious side effects.

The appropriate dose of jimson weed depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for jimson weed. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Esophageal reflux: In esophageal reflux, food and liquid in the stomach leak backwards into the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach (esophagus). Jimson weed might make this condition worse because it slows down the process that empties the stomach. It also lowers the pressure in the bottom of the esophagus, making it more likely that stomach contents will go back up.

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Diets containing 0.5, 1.58 and 5.0% jimson weed seed were fed to male and female rats (20/group) in a 90-day subchronic feeding study. The alkaloid content was 2.71 mg atropine and 0.66 mg scopolamine/g of seed. Gross clinical observations, body weights and feed and water intakes were recorded weekly. Tear production and pupil dilation measurements were made throughout the study. At 90 days, all of the animals were autopsied and clinical-chemistry analyses, complete haematology and bone-marrow evaluation for evidence of clastogenic effects were performed. Tissues from control (0% seed) and high-dose animals were examined histologically. The principal effects of jimson weed seed were: decreased body-weight gain, serum albumin and serum calcium; increased liver and testes weights (as a percentage of body weight), serum alkaline phosphatase and blood urea nitrogen. Female rats showed more marked responses to jimson weed seed than did males. In addition to the effects seen in both sexes, the females developed decreased serum total protein and cholesterol, and increased serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and chloride, red blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration and packed red cell volume. No histological lesions were associated with ingestion of jimson weed seed at 5.0%. It is concluded that jimson weed seed at concentrations of 0.5% or more in the diet produced adverse physiological changes in rats.

Food and Chemical Toxicology

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