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is a lot of seeds in weed bad

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

There’s a seed in my bud!

What causes seeds?

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

Quick Growing Tip: Utilise environmental factors to boost trichome production. Strains such as ICE are genetically wired to develop high quantities of trichomes.

Although you can’t judge a book by its cover, you can definitely judge cannabis buds by their appearance. There are many factors that indicate quality to a trained eye, and colour is one of the most important.

How to tell the difference between good and bad cannabis buds.

Orange/Brown Pistils

Contents:

To ensure you only buy the best buds, learning the differences between top-shelf fire from rugged brick weed is vital. You don’t need to be a connoisseur either, as the differentiating traits can be seen and smelled with no assistance. Learning the differences will help you browse the shelves, sure, but it’ll especially help you judge the plants in your own garden. That, in turn, will help you make any necessary adjustments.

Most growers manage to dial in their nutrients, watering schedule, and environmental variables enough to produce cannabis of this quality. The most important factor, though, is putting pride and effort into their work.

Grinding up dense cannabis flowers seems to almost double their size. Even a small chunk of a compact flower can grind down to fill a good-sized joint. In contrast, fluffy buds yield disappointment and less plant matter. These airy flowers are often the result of suboptimal growing conditions, a lack of light, or nutrient deficiency.

Good genetics is a key factor in obtaining quality bud, but growing the flower is only half the job. The rest of the effort must come from the grower after the harvest. The same happens with trimming. When you see that the buds are too leafy, they weren’t cared for properly. Leaves don’t get you high. So apart from paying more than what you’re actually going to smoke, it shows carelessness. Don’t buy your weed from someone who doesn’t care about it.

Before anything else, look at the cherry and the ash of the joint. The ash should always be white. If ash is grey or black, then the weed is too humid. This isn’t conclusive when it comes to the quality of the high. However, a humid flower will give you a nasty headache and will have extra water weight. You’ll be paying for a lot of water, which won’t add anything to your high.

Low-quality bud, most commonly referred to as “shwag,” “ditch weed,” and “brick weed,” is something to stay away from. This is the weed that will be a waste of money unless you’re smoking for the first time. The high will be far away from what you expect. You’ll probably be stuck with a harsh headache and sleepy vibes, but nothing else. To ease transportation within the black market, cannabis is many times compressed into bricks, leaving you with a lot of stems and leaves that will only ruin your joint.

LOOKING INTO THAT “DIRTY SHWAG”

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

Good-quality cannabis will be super sticky. It should coat your grinder with a delicious, yet annoying, layer of resin (but hey, that’s the price you pay for your fire weed). This happens because of the gooey trichomes, not humidity. Although sticky, your nugs should be crisp and crunchy too. The grinding experience should be pleasant, not an arm exercise.

Low-quality bud, most commonly referred to as “shwag,” “ditch weed,” and “brick weed,” is something to stay away from. This is the weed that will be a waste of money unless you’re smoking for the first time. The high will be far away from what you expect. You’ll probably be stuck with a harsh headache and sleepy vibes, but nothing else. To ease transportation within the black market, cannabis is many times compressed into bricks, leaving you with a lot of stems and leaves that will only ruin your joint.

Ideally, you’ll be able to pick it up, open the bag and have a real close look and feel of the flower before you take it home. If so, here is what to look for: