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Fat Hen
Fat Hen grows us to 27cm high with broad leaves and small indistinct green/white flowers. Related to tree spinach, fat hen was eaten as a vegetable in neolithic times and is rich in vitamin C.

Speedwell
Speedwell is a ground hugging Spring and Autumn weed with prostrate foliage and pretty pale blue flowers.

Prickly Milk (Sow) Thistle.
Can grow up to 90cm high but often smaller with pale yellow flowers.

If soil is dry or shady the plants will set seed when young so keep an eye out under shade plants like parsnips, courgettes or cabbage. Remember to remove any flower heads after hoeing as they will still make viable seed even if left uprooted on the soil.

Fat Hen is found on rich soil so is commonly found in the vegetable garden. Seedlings germinate in dense patches and look harmless at first but quickly grow into large plants if allowed to remain.

Alternatively, consider removing grass and growing shade-loving plants such as vinca, English ivy, pachysandra, or hosta that compete well with weeds (though they can also become weeds themselves, so plant at your own risk!). In areas where Creeping Charlie has become established, try removing plants by hand. This is the control method of choice in vegetable or flower gardens. Try to pull the weed without breaking it and over time it may give up.

If you don’t mind giving your lawn over to dandelions, that’s fine. However, you may wish to consider investing in a lawn. In time, dandelions will also take over any habitat from your garden to your ornamentals to your grasses. They have the most weedy characteristics of all the weeds. Not only do dandelions have wind-borne seed but also reproduce vegetatively thanks to large tap roots. So unless you cut the root deep into the soil, you can rest assured the plant will reemerge.

Canada thistle is difficult to control because its extensive and deep root system allows it to recover from control attempts. Horizontal roots may extend 15 feet or more and vertical roots may grow 6 to 15 feet deep! Seeds may retain viability 4+ years in the soil.

Learn More About Weeds

Bindweed can grow through many mulches so you need to use landscape fabrics such as polypropylene and polyester or mulches such as black plastic or cardboard but also ensure that the edges of the covering overlap so that the bindweed stems can’t find their way into the light. If holes are made in the fabric or plastic for plants, bindweed will grow through these holes. A landscape fabric placed over soil then covered with bark or other plant-derived product (e.g., organic matter) or rock will likely keep field bindweed from emerging. It might take more than 3 years of light exclusion before the bindweed dies. Once landscape fabric or other mulch is removed, new bindweed plants might germinate from seed in the soil; be sure to monitor the site for new seedlings.

The primary method of management for common purslane is prevention. In home landscapes and gardens, this weed is generally managed by hand-weeding. Pull out this weed as soon as you see it and destroy the plant; this weed can live in your soil for years!

Is Canada Thistle Edible?

How to Control Canada Thistle