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i dont want your weed too many stems and seeds

Almost every stoner of experience you’ll meet has a story about the time they bought weed that turned out to be anything but. It could be anything from crushed oregano to sage to basil to a wad of old, dried-out lettuce balled up in some cling wrap. Catnip is another popular pot substitute.

Another visual red flag would be larger marijuana leaves attached to your nugs, which indicates a sloppy "trim" when the buds were separated from the plant. Cannabis that gets trimmed by machines (as opposed to carefully trimmed by hand) might have diminished potency, and the leaves themselves don’t offer much of the cannabinoid compounds that people prize in marijuana.

A good rule of thumb in buying weed is that you want weed you can actually, uh, smoke. The stems of cannabis plants — though they may count toward the weight of your gram or eighth — are pretty much useless in that regard, so the less there are, the better. Seeds are even worse; they’ll literally explode when set on fire, potentially blowing out an entire bowl or ruining your joint. Even sellers of low-grade ganja usually won’t sell you stuff with seeds in it, but if you’re continually finding a few in each bag, it’s time to find a new source.

It’s moldy, rotting or poorly cultivated

While many Americans can now buy and grow marijuana legally — choosing from an endlessly varied selection of premium bud — some still have to take it wherever they can find it. Even U.S. government researchers are forced to work with what most experienced cannabis users would deem pretty bad weed.

You don’t want to get ripped off and smoke an inferior product, of course. So how can you tell if your flower isn’t up to snuff (or puff)? Believe it or not, you don’t need a doctorate in botany or chromatography instruments to tell whether your stash is shit. Read on, esteemed stoner, and learn some simple warning signs.

As with the food in your pantry or refrigerator, you’ve got to keep an eye out for mold and rot. These can afflict even decent marijuana, and they look like the mold and rot you’re used to finding on bread or cheese — furry discolorations on the surface. Packing this crap in your bong can make you seriously sick, don’t risk it.

Arguably the worst thing about bad pot is that it’s not very potent — which means you have to smoke a ton of it to feel anything like the high you’re after. In that case, you’re liable to get a headache before you’re even halfway stoned. Some users have encountered weed so crummy that it doesn’t seem to work at all. If you wind up with bud that only produces noxious smoke and induces a general nausea or cranial pain, what’s the point? Ditch that garbage and find out where the dank nugs are at — because you deserve better.

When planting into the ground, make sure not to crowd your plants so their roots don’t run into each other.

When transplanting cannabis, give the plant at least double the space of its previous container. This reduces the number of times you need to transplant and minimizes the risk of transplant shock, which may occur when a plant experiences extreme stress from root disturbance.

Number of leaves

A weed plant should be in its final pot or in the ground with plenty of room for its roots before it enters the flowering stage. During flowering, a plant will increase in both size and volume, as the plant itself continues to grow and as buds develop. It will require a substantial amount of space for root development.

The same goes for transplanting outside, in the ground—you can go straight from the first pot into the ground, but it depends on when you transplant and your local climate and weather.

For the seeds that do make it, they will need bigger homes after several weeks of growing and will need to be transplanted either into a bigger pot or directly into the ground.

Using the right containers for your weed might not seem like a big deal, but you’d be surprised just how crucial this variable is. Here are some factors you should consider:

Monitoring pH is important since cannabis can only uptake nutrients within a relatively small window. If the pH level is too low or too high, your plants will get sick.

5. IMPROPER HUMIDITY FOR SEEDLINGS

Use some type of absorbent paper (kitchen paper, coffee filter) and place a couple sheets on a flat surface such as a plate. Put your seeds on the paper, spaced a little apart, and cover with a couple more sheets over the top. Moisten the paper and make sure to keep it damp so it doesn’t dry out. After a few days, when the seeds have sprouted 2–3mm taproots, transfer them to their seedling pots.

Cannabis is generally an easy plant to grow, but this doesn’t mean that mistakes don’t happen. As a matter of fact, even experienced growers get things wrong from time to time. But, by learning about common growing mistakes and how to avoid them, you can look forward to plenty of fat buds waiting for you at harvest time.

Fill a small seedling pot with an unfertilised or “light” potting mix. Poke a small hole about 1cm deep in the middle and place your seed inside. Cover lightly with soil. Water the soil and cover the seedling pot with clingfilm to lock in moisture. Seeds should germinate in a few days.