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how to revive weed seeds

To discourage any light from getting in, place the seeds in an opaque container. While it’s unlikely that the seeds will enjoy much sunlight in your crisper drawer, placing the seeds in a small container means that you can more readily control their immediate environment. On top of shutting out light and excess moisture, place small bags of silica gel in with the seeds. This will help prevent any excess moisture build up, effectively keeping your seeds viable for extended periods of time.

You might find yourself asking “How long do marijuana seeds last?” This is a great question, and the answer almost solely depends on the methods of preservation. Depending on how you’ve stored your seeds, they can essentially last indefinitely.

Soil Method

This is a pretty common practice used to germinate almost any seed. Take a few moist paper towels and place the seeds you’d like to germinate on top. Place a few more moist towels on top of the seeds and seal in a container. Keep the container somewhere it will be warm and get a bit of light. Seeds should germinate in about 72 hours.

For stubborn seeds, place them in a glass of water with a few drops of hydrogen peroxide for about 24 hours. The hydrogen peroxide will help break down the outer shell and get water into the sprout where it’s needed. Once the seeds are done soaking, take them out of the mixture and rinse, then follow up with the soil or paper towel method.

In order to store seeds correctly, you’ll have to provide them with a cool, dry environment. The idea here is to prevent the seeds from trying to germinate before you’re ready to stick them in the ground. Light, water, and heat are all things that help seeds sprout, so it should come as no surprise that you’d need an almost total absence of these things in order to store seeds for long periods of time.

Plant infestations from spider mites, fungus gnats, fruit flies, and other insects are all too common when you grow cannabis. When you have finally gotten rid of the pests, you want to make absolutely sure that they don’t return. Pest infestations can really ravage a plant, so it certainly needs optimal care and time to be revived.

Likewise, the humidity levels of your room must be kept within a certain range depending on the phase of growth. An optimal humidity level for flowering plants is 40–50%. Plants in the vegetative growth phase can tolerate a more humid environment, from 40–70%. If the humidity is too high, you need to look into better ventilation for your grow space. A dehumidifier is the best, albeit expensive option here. Your sick plants will have a hard time recovering if their environment is not stable and optimal.

If you’re growing indoors, the first step to reviving your plants is to check the temperature and relative humidity of your tent or grow room. The ideal temperature for cuttings and seedlings is between 20–25ºC. As the plants get older, they can tolerate a bit more, up to 28ºC. Everything above this is excessive and causes stress, which will make it much more difficult for your plants to recover.

KEEP PESTS AWAY

Cultivators normally keep their wattage levels as high as possible to encourage plants to grow faster. More light means the plant is working harder and will likely produce a greater yield. On the other hand, a plant that is working extra hard is more susceptible to deficiencies and other problems. One way to give your sick plant a break is to decrease the light intensity. Move your lights higher up and further away from your plants, or decrease the wattage.

When you grow indoors with your lights on a timer, you can also cut down on the daily light hours your plants receive. When you reduce the light hours for the vegetative phase to only 17 or 16 a day, this will give your plants more time to “rest” and recover.

For those growing in soil, compost teas are an excellent supplement to support the recovery of sick and stressed plants. Compost teas can make your plants grow faster and more robust, making them less susceptible to diseases and deficiencies. Some cultivators make their own compost teas at home, although they can also be purchased at most well-sorted grow stores.

To flush your plants, drench the growing medium with water numerous times. It should be ample enough that liquid comes out from the bottom of the container each time. For example, if you grow in 7l pots, flush your plants with 14l of water. When you grow in soil, your water should have a pH of about 6.5pH. After the flush, you can begin giving nutrients again, starting with ½ or ¾-strength doses. You can slowly work your way up from here to avoid putting plants under any additional stress.