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how to grow weed from scavenged seeds

Rapid fall growth in short windows, allows radishes to fit perfectly into a traditional corn and soybean rotation. Radish residue breaks down very quickly in the spring, leaving a clean seed bed until early April. The residue has been proven to inhibit small seeded annuals from germinating. Nutrients that were scavenged are readily released back into the soil for the subsequent crop. A field planted in radishes, will allow the soil to dry and warm faster in the spring. The large root channel left behind is rich in nutrients, allows tremendous water infiltration, reduces water erosion, and a path for crops roots to follow through compacted soil layers. During decomposition, radish biofumigates the soil which can reduce pest and nematode populations.

Radishes claim to fame was achieved through its renowned taproot, rapid fall growth and its ability to scavenge residual nutrients. Their roots have the potential to grow several inches in diameter with a thick taproot extending 12 – 20″ into the soil and a smaller taproot that can reach depths around 6′. This massive root is capable of penetrating plow pans or compaction layers in your soil. This process is referred to as “Bio-drilling” and it’s able to replace the need for deep tillage on your operation. Scavenging residual nutrients is this species specialty. Radishes are extraordinary at scavenging residual nutrients such as N, P, K, S, Ca and B and releasing them back into the soil profile in the spring for your upcoming crop. Under perfect conditions, radish has been proven to accumulate around 100-150 lbs/A of N. This species is excellent to plant after a manure application, in ordered to capture the readily available nutrients from being lost to the environment. The residue produced is known for it’s fall and early spring weed suppression. Radishes have been proven to boost wheat yields 5 bushel when 2 lbs/A was added at planting.

Basic Info

Cereal rye is one of the most versatile and commonly used cover crops in the country. Rye is the most winter hardy of all cereal crops in various growing conditions. It’s most commonly planted in a corn/soybean rotation, before a soybean crop the following season. This species is known for its late fall to early spring nutrient scavenging, grazing potential and erosion control. This species remarkable spring growth, has the potential to produce a lot of residue or forage. The residue is a great harbor for beneficial insects, most notably lady bugs. Also, the residue gives off allelopathic chemicals up to a month after termination, which aids in preventing small seeded weeds and grasses from germinating.

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Basic Info

*Based on a 1-10 scale. 1 = Poor : 5 = Average : 10 = Excellent

Cereal Rye has an excellent fibrous root system that alleviates surface compaction. Rye can be successful planted later then almost any other cover crop due to its low germination and growth temperature requirements. Cereal rye is known for being the best cereal crop at retaining residual N. It’s typical for a fall planted cereal rye crop to scavenge on average 25 to 50 lbs of N, with cases scavenging in excess of 100 lbs of N. The vigorous spring growth has successful weed suppression through competition and allelopathic chemicals. Rye can be terminated in the spring through the alternative methods of rolling, mowing, or crimping after boot stage. Rye will out yield any other cereal crops when planted in droughty, infertile, or sandy soils.

Cereal Rye has an excellent fibrous root system that alleviates surface compaction. Rye can be successful planted later then almost any other cover crop due to its low germination and growth temperature requirements. Cereal rye is known for being the best cereal crop at retaining residual N. It’s typical for a fall planted cereal rye crop to scavenge on average 25 to 50 lbs of N, with cases scavenging in excess of 100 lbs of N. The vigorous spring growth has successful weed suppression through competition and allelopathic chemicals. Rye can be terminated in the spring through the alternative methods of rolling, mowing, or crimping after boot stage. Rye will out yield any other cereal crops when planted in droughty, infertile, or sandy soils.