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how long does it take to dry weed seeds

By placing individual buds on a drying rack—or hanging entire branches in a drying room—you’ll reduce the water content of your buds by 10–15%. This process removes water from the outer layers of each flower, but you’ll need to cure your stash to rid moisture from deeper within the buds.

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Drying your cannabis flowers serves several important functions that ultimately increase the quality and shelf-life of the end product.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DRYING AND CURING?

Drying, as the name suggests, involves drying fresh buds so they contain less moisture and can be smoked or vaporized properly. Curing, on the other hand, involves storing your buds in closed containers over a period of at least two weeks. This helps develop the flavour and aroma of your buds as they mature.

The process of growing cannabis does not stop at harvest time. Properly drying and curing your fresh cannabis stash is paramount to prevent mould contamination from taking place. These procedures will also result in buds that taste better and offer a superior high.

Ahhh, harvest time. After watching your ladies grow and flower, it’s finally time to collect your hard-earned buds. But before you can enjoy a toke of some homegrown Kush, you’ll need to dry and cure your freshly harvested weed. Below, we’ll share our answers to some frequently asked questions on the drying and curing process, so you can maximise the flavour and potency of your stash.

Get the answers to 9 of the most frequently asked questions about drying and curing cannabis.

So about a month after harvest usually have 99.99% germination rate and store seeds properly tagged in plastic vials with some rice in the frizzer in air-tight containers. Make sure to remove all small bits vegetable matter and grade your seed before storing them.

After harvest, seeds continue to develop during drying and curing and if you pull them out fresh and quickly dried without some more dry and cure they don’t germinate very well. After harvest trim slightly and dump the buds in a humidor box for 12-14 hours for initial cure to even their humidity and prepare for slow dry. Then put them in brown bags for 2-3 days to dry a bit (usually moisture decreases significantly for that time) and then move them back to the humidor box to continue slow dry and cure for about 7-10 days.

When RH is about 63-65% inside the humidor and buds are ready for jarring, mature seeds start falling off. At this point start pulling out the seeds gently and chopping the buds on small bits. When all seeds are out, DRY THE HUMIDOR BOX VERY WELL AFTER BUDS ARE JARRED AND PUT THE SEEDS BACK. The point is seeds to dry on lower RH.

There are different opinions and methods about storing your seeds for a long term – in frizzer, refrigerator or room temperature.

SHORTLY: DON’T DRY CANNABIS SEEDS QUICKLY and don’t store them immediately after harvest.

Marijuana seeds should be kept in a cool, dark place such as a basement or in your refrigerator. They should be in an air-tight container and must stay dry. Putting a cotton ball in with the seeds before storage can help suck up any extra moisture (this is why you often see little bits of cotton in seed breeder packs).

Heat and moisture ‘signal’ to cannabis seeds that it’s time to sprout, so as long as you keep the seeds in a dry, dark environment they can remain viable for years. I have heard cases of seeds sprouting after being in storage for 5 or even 10 years. However, you will notice that older seeds take longer to germinate than fresh seeds and a few of them may not sprout at all. As time goes on, fewer and fewer of the seeds will successfully germinate.