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harvest weed seed systems

At harvest time, weeds that have escaped season long management often have mature seed still attached to the parent plants. These weed seeds can enter the combine along with the cash crop and exit the back of the combine in the chaff portion (small plant pieces and weed seeds), separate from be spread across the field as well as from one field to another. It seems a waste to spend all year spraying weeds with expensive herbicides only to reward the survivors at harvest by spreading their weed seeds out for next year.

Research has demonstrated that all are very effective weed seedbank management tactics for a range of weed species, achieving over 80 percent control and for some nearly 100 percent.

3 steps to get it working for you

There are six systems currently used to collect and manage weed seed at harvest. They can be grouped according to the way crop residue is managed: chaff only or chaff + straw.

Chaff lining funnels the chaff and weed seeds into narrow rows behind the combine, where the residue is left to overwinter. The weed seeds are exposed to natural elements that can lead to weed seed decay and predation. Typically a follow-up herbicide application is required. – Chaff lining is usually considered a good entry-level HWSC option.

Chaff decks (chaff tramlining) are similar to chaff lining, but place the chaff in one or both of the combine’s wheel tracks. The added compaction from the wheels can be beneficial in controlled traffic systems.

In the southern cropping region, low harvest height has been a barrier to adoption with growers not wanting to slow harvest down, incurring higher fuel costs and reducing harvester efficiency. Growers and researchers have since been looking at tactics that will enhance the efficacy of harvest weed seed control without slowing harvest. One option being adopted is sowing crops at narrower row spacings or higher plant populations. Weeds are then forced to grow taller to compete for light, therefore producing seed higher in the crop canopy. Stripper fronts are also being investigated to gauge any differences with weed seed capture and harvest efficiency, reducing the need to cut low whilst minimising fuel consumption.

One of the most popular weed management tactics being adopted in recent years is harvest weed seed control (HWSC). This process takes advantage of seed retention at maturity by collecting weed seeds as they pass through the harvester. Problematic weeds such as annual ryegrass, brome grass and wild radish retain 77-95% of their seed above a harvest cut height of 15cm at maturity, creating an ideal opportunity for seed collection.

Harvest weed seed control (HWSC) practices

Each harvest weed seed control practice has its own benefits and challenges with growers leading the charge, working with a small group of researchers to develop harvester modifications that maximise weed seed control with harvest height and seed retention. For harvest weed seed control to be successful at the farm level the practice needs to be both cost effective and practical to fit in with existing operations.

Herbicide resistance remains an ongoing challenge for Australian grain growers but the industry is continually innovating to minimise the risks. Non-chemical tools are becoming mainstream practice so that growers and advisers can deal with herbicide resistance by reducing weed seed banks and protecting chemistry.

An online twitter survey was conducted in November 2017 by WeedSmart with 269 growers responding. The results indicated that harvest weed seed control practices are changing, with narrow windrow burning declining at the expense of chaff lining and chaff decks. 32% of growers were planning to use narrow windrow burning in 2017 whilst 26% would be chaff lining and 9% using chaff decks. Chaff carts were stable at 13%, mill technology at 3% and 14% would be doing nothing.