Posted on

ground cover weed with seed pods

1. UMass Extension Turf Program, “Biology and Management of Crabgrass,” University of Massachusetts Amherst, May 2011.

2. Roncoroni, J., “Dandelion,” University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program, January 2018.

When unwelcome weeds turn up in your lawn, don’t wait and watch them spread. Reclaim your turf with IMAGE brand and IMAGE All-In-One Weed Killer. You can kill lawn weeds — roots and all — and get back to a beautiful, healthy, weed-free lawn.

For best results, treat new weeds as they emerge from soil, when they’re young, actively growing and still less than 3 inches tall. This stops these lawn pests before they can establish, set seed and spread on their own. Used as directed, IMAGE All-In-One Weed Killer is guaranteed not to harm your lawn.*

Sources:

*Always read product labels thoroughly and follow instructions, including guidelines for specific lawn grass types.

To help your lawn grass stay at its competitive peak, follow these “good practices” as well:

What is your personal favourite weed and why?

JP: Weeds vary dramatically within small areas so every region of Canada is unique. However, from province to province and within each local ecotype, certain weed species will be more prevalent than others. Many common weeds and invasive species are thankfully more prominent in agriculture (Lamb's-quarters — Chenopodium album) and in natural areas (Common Reed — Phragmites australis) than they are in our gardens; however, there is some crossover between those areas and our gardens.

JP: In a garden setting, it can be unclear which plants are meant to be there and which are invaders. Mark the locations of your desirable plants so that you know approximately where they will emerge. Anything that emerges in other locations may be a weed. There aren't specific morphological characteristics within these plants that tell you they are weeds. If you see lots of seedlings emerging in mass or clusters, they could be weeds. If you see plants emerging or greening up earlier than our native species in spring, they could be weeds. Take pictures of the difficult ones and send to your local public garden or a friendly gardener you know — hopefully they will help you identify them.

Related Stories

Jon Peter: All weeds are plants — they're just plants in the wrong location. Weeds are generally classified by their life cycle. Annual weeds are plants that grow from seeds that are dispersed by a parent plant each spring. Biennial weeds are plants that grow marginally in the first year, then flower, produce fruit, then die in the second year, and perennial weeds, such as dandelions, lay dormant in winter and return in spring. Weeds are often classified into general categories including lawn weeds, garden weeds, noxious weeds and invasive weeds, as well as their undesirable qualities, including aggressiveness, low aesthetic value, toxicity, etc.

JP: First, remember that all weeds are plants too. Best advice is to be patient, sometimes the identity of the plant can't be guaranteed until the plant is flowering so waiting is often the best thing to do. Proper identification is the most important step in determining what you'll need to do to either abolish or control a plant. And some plants can be toxic to humans, so it's important to know what things are before dealing with them. Wear proper protective gear if you are uncertain.

Do you have a good tip for reducing weeds? Tell us about it in the comments below.

What makes weeds so prolific?