Posted on

gow to tell mail n female seeds apart weed

One of the biggest myths of sexing cannabis seeds comes from a popular chart online.

This will mostly happen when a plant is stressed by its environment. When this happens, the plant may think it’s going to die and as a result, will change itself into a hermaphrodite plant. By doing so, it will be able to self-pollinate itself and survive.

5 Tips on How to Sex Marijuana Plants

This has been a question that has become a very hot topic online these days. After a quick search, growers can find multiple charts and explanations on how to sex cannabis seeds.

The chart states that one can determine the sex of a cannabis seed by just looking at them. Within the chart, five cannabis seeds are shown. Three of these are female and two are male, supposedly. This chart says to look for a crater at the bottom of the seed. It explains that females will have a depression that is perfectly round. While males will have a crater that is misshapen and not uniform. However, this is simply not true. The craters found in cannabis seeds have nothing to do with the sex of a seed.

This same chart states that females will also roll easily across a table or surface, while males will not. While it does say that a magnifying glass and pair of tweezers is needed to examine the seeds. neither of these tools will make it any easier to determine the sex of cannabis seeds.

If you’re growing cannabis from feminized seeds, or seeds that have been cultivated to produce only female plants, the plants should grow to be exclusively female. With non-feminized or regular seeds, approximately half the plants will turn out to be male.

Hermaphrodite plants, or “hermies” as they are sometimes known, grow both male and female sex organs. Some cannabis cultivars such as Thai Sativa are true hermaphrodites with the tendency to express hermaphroditism in their genes. However, hermaphrodite plants generally occur as an outcome of stress, such as photoperiod disruptions, nutrient deficiencies, or disease. It’s vital to check female plants carefully to ensure the buds are female, and there are no male flowers that could result in the plant fertilizing itself.

How can you tell if a plant is a female before it flowers?

Young cannabis plants first begin to demonstrate signs of gender, or pre-flowers, a month after germination while the plant is still in the vegetative stage. These pre-flowers can appear as soon as four weeks after germination. However, it can take up to six weeks before the male pre-flowers are distinguishable from the female pre-flowers. While the signs for gender can be subtle, with practice, a dedicated grower can pick them out. A magnifying glass may be helpful as pre-flowers are often challenging to distinguish with the naked eye.

Male plants don’t produce buds. The male sex organs of the cannabis plant instead produce pollen sacs that are designed to fertilize the female bud and form seeds. Seedy female buds are undesirable as they provide lower-quality cannabis. It’s essential to remove the male and hermaphroditic plants from a crop as soon as possible to protect the quality of the female buds.

Maintaining a crop of exclusively female plants prevents the possibility of male plants fertilizing female plants, leading to seed production. Fertilized female plants don’t create as much cannabinoid content as unfertilized females. When a female bud is fertilized, the plant’s energy and nutrients are directed to creating seeds, rather than forming THC-rich buds. Seedless female buds are known as sinsemilla and are celebrated for their longer bud-producing life and higher THC levels.