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edible weed seeds

One of the basic principles of cultivating good food crops is the removal of all plants that would compete for space, nutrients, light, and moisture: Weeds. These plants grow quickly and seem to spread like viruses. They can easily take over a neglected patch of soil in no time. But how many of these end up in the compost heap rather than the salad bowl? How many of these garden foes are actually edible, nutritious, versatile, and delicious? It turns out that lots of them are. Growing edible weeds can be easy and rewarding.

Goosefoot – A tall cousin of lamb’s quarters, this fast growing plant has large edible leaves that taste great and are high in fibre. Use the young, mineral-rich, magenta-tipped leaves raw in salad mixes. Save some of the high protein seeds for making bread or feeding wild birds. Harvest thoroughly, as Giant Goosefoot can reach 2m (6’) tall or more.

Huauzontle – A close cousin of Goosefoot! The close relationship between this ancient meso-American crop and quinoa are obvious as soon as it blooms. The seed head that follows produces bowls full of edible grains, but without the bitter saponin coating found on quinoa seeds. The immature leaves of huauzaontle are also edible.

Chickweed – It even has the word ‘weed’ in its name! Packed with vitamins, minerals, and protein, this is one of the tastiest and most succulent of all the wild greens. Take three cuttings or more from each sowing or use it as a cover crop — it breaks down as quickly as buckwheat to enrich the soil. Add a handful to salads or try some in a sandwich. Chickweed has a very mild flavour, so it should only be cooked briefly, but it’s probably better raw. It grows very well in containers, too.

Orach – This little known relative of quinoa produces bright fuchsia, succulent, tasty leaves unlike any other salad leaf. Its subtle, salty flavour earns it the colloquial name Saltbush . The eye-catching leaves simply pop in salad mixes. This variety is descended from wild mountain spinach originally growing in Montana.

The omega-3 fatty acids that the seeds contain can strengthen your brain and heart and improve other vital functions of your body. Although these acids are present in the cannabis seeds, they are best found in the oil and heart. Cold-pressed oil is ideal as it is of the best possible quality if you prefer to use hemp seed oil in the place of the physical heart.

Many brands now offer hemp protein powder, which consists of powdered seeds. It can be a little expensive, but it is becoming increasingly popular worldwide.

Instead of making drastic changes in your life, bring in cannabis seeds or peeled hemp. It is easier to achieve a healthy diet. Enjoy cannabis seeds at the beginning of your day and offer your body its numerous benefits. Use it daily and notice the great results on your body.

Over time, more and more people realize the benefits of cannabis. Not only the raw cannabis leaves but also their seeds and hulled hemp are gaining popularity. There are a lot of benefits that these nut-tasting seeds have to offer.

A diet high in omega fatty acids that cannabis seeds offer you will improve your blood pressure and cardiovascular functions. According to a study, this could help protect your brain from dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and other mental illnesses, but also combat possible drug addiction.

Most of the best cannabis seed-based products are made and produced in Canada and Europe. Then they are exported to countries that are not so friendly to growing cannabis. The United States has also seen a normalization of agricultural culture and industrialization of hemp plants.

You can add them to hummus or yoghurt and still enjoy the original taste of your food. Cannabis seeds have a nutty flavour and can even make the less tasty or tasteless food taste a little better. Dietitians often recommend them!

According to some studies, there is an interaction between the use of cannabis and the Body Mass Index. Thus, it is possible to maintain weight or lose or gain excess weight by eating cannabis seeds.