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do weed seeds need light to sprout

Start by filling pots with a premium-quality soil that has been soaked in water. Many growers also choose to lace the water with a root stimulator. Make a hole roughly 10–15mm deep. This will be your seed’s new home. Remove the seeds from their packet and place them into the pre-dug holes. Loosely cover the seeds, but be careful not to compress the soil above the seed too much. The root will struggle to penetrate solid soil, slowing plant growth. Lightly spray the top of where you placed the seed so that your growing medium stays moist.

You will need to invest in a few pieces of unique equipment, but by using stone wool blocks, you can create a perfect utopia for germinating cannabis seeds. Soak the stone wool blocks in the same way you would a soil medium. The wool will retain the moisture and prevent the need to water during the early stages of germination. After the wool blocks are soaked, stick them in a plastic tray that also has a lid. Large cake tubs are ideal.

After 3–5 days, the seeds will start to open, and you should see tiny white tips appear. Once these roots reach 2–3mm in length, use extreme care to transfer them from the water to pre-prepared soil pots.

WET KITCHEN TOWEL METHOD

The Royal Queen Seeds Feminized Starter Kit contains:

Planting directly into your growing medium prevents having to move seeds when they are at their most fragile. That first root tip is covered with microscopic filaments that are easily damaged. Given that both a cup full of water and moist paper towels are more prone to temperature fluctuations from their environment, planting in soil is a much safer option.

The soil pots will need small holes (roughly 10–15mm deep) for the newly germinated seeds to be placed into. Once the seeds are secure, you will want to place a fluorescent light 13–15cm (5–6 inches) away to encourage growth. Finally, don’t risk overwatering your seeds at this early stage. Use a plant mister to make sure they stay damp but not soaking wet.

Probably one of the most common methods of germination. The kitchen towel method comes in several iterations. Some growers use cotton wool pads or absorbent pieces of paper. For this guide, we will be using kitchen towel as it is readily available and holds moisture relatively well.

Many people choose to germinate their seeds using paper towels. However, others choose to do so directly in soil. Of course, germinating your seeds in soil isn’t inherently bad, but it can come with its own set of challenges, and is generally not recommended unless necessary.

For instance, the upper layer of soil can dry out within 48 hours, making it more difficult to give your seeds the right amount of water they need without overdoing it. Giving your soil too much water during germination could result in the seed rising up or dropping down further, inhibiting its viability. Moreover, seeds that are planted too deep in the soil could experience a host of complications. They could suffocate before coming into contact with enough oxygen, and be unable to access sufficient light to progress into the seedling stage of their life cycle.

Germination is where the magic begins. Cannabis seeds must first germinate in order to sprout and begin their journey as living, breathing plants. However, if the germination process is done incorrectly, or is thwarted by some other variable, seeds can fail to sprout, leaving you with useless, spent seeds instead. Here are the top five mistakes to avoid when germinating cannabis seeds.

TEMPERATURE PROBLEMS

The amount of water you supply your seeds during the germination process will also affect their ability to successfully germinate. Some growers attempt to germinate by “drowning” them in a glass of water. While this ensures they will not go thirsty, it can actually be more harmful than helpful.

Once they pop, seedlings are very delicate and must be watered carefully. When germinating, your medium should be damp, but not overly wet for best results. On the other hand, a dry environment is basically a death sentence for your seeds. They need a constant source of moisture to sprout, otherwise they’re good as duds.

It is also likely that the quality of your seeds will affect their ability to handle direct light. Seeds that are already having a tough time germinating will have an even worse time doing so if they are exposed to excess light.

Seeds that have been improperly stored may also fail to germinate. These tiny packages of DNA prefer to be kept in a cool, dark place with moderate humidity. Exposing them to heat, light, or extreme humidity levels (both high and low) could result in seeds losing their viability. As long as you source your seeds from reputable seedbanks and store them appropriately, you shouldn’t have to worry about bad seeds ruining your chances of successful germination.