Posted on

can you use weed with a seed pod in it

If you have fully mature seeds in your buds then you can pull them out or leave them it’s up to you. A few seeds won’t hurt anything as long as you don’t smoke them

Well today I was looking at my plants, and the big one has seeds everywere. It has been flowering for about 2 monts now, under a 400 hps. Well when I checked it, they were everywere. Can I just pull them off? Should I just leave it?

I have been doing some searching on this sight, and It seems some people have seeds in their buds, and some have obvious male characteristics, more near where branc meets. If I no signs of seeds at base, and no bananas, is it not a hermi?

budd23

If you have fully mature seeds in your buds then you can pull them out or leave them it’s up to you. A few seeds won’t hurt anything as long as you don’t smoke them

Thanks for your time.

Calyxes are seed pods, if they get pollenated they will grow seeds, if not they swell up with resin. Trichomes are the "crystals" that protect the leaves and calyxes from insects and fungal disease.

It’s my biggest plant, looks very healty, but is right next to my other plant. I don’t wan’t to chop her, but I don’t want this to happen again.

Once the seed pods ripen, disturbing the pods will send the seeds flying as far as 16 feet. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Flowers and seed pods of hairy bittercress. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Hairy bittercress leaves have two or more pairs of leaflets and a kidney shaped terminal leaflet. Photo by Lori Imboden, MSU Extension.

Hairy bittercress is best managed mechanically when it is young. Remove it by hand, hoe or tillage in early fall or early spring before it sets seed. If plants are flowering, composting is discouraged as seeds may develop. To manage this weed using herbicides, the proactive approach would be to use a pre-emergence herbicide in the late summer (late August to early September) to target the plants at the time of germination and prevent successful emergence.

Have you recently noticed plants with small, white flowers on the edges of your lawn, flowerbeds and rock pathways? During April and May, populations of the winter annual weed hairy bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta) become increasingly visible. Hairy bittercress has a low growing rosette similar in form to a dandelion. It raises its profile in early spring with the appearance of flowers and seeds on a vertical stem. Like many members of the mustard family, hairy bittercress sets seed prolifically. It grows quickly and a few plants or seeds can generate a more widespread infestation in even a year’s time.

Hairy bittercress is a winter annual weed. Its seeds germinate in fall beginning as early as September. The first true leaves are heart-shaped, followed by compound leaves with two or more pairs of leaflets and a kidney shaped terminal leaflet. The leaves that emerge in the fall form a small rosette that will overwinter. Once the weather warms in spring, it sends up stalks of small, white flowers followed by slender seed pods known as siliques.

Hairy bittercress is an annual weed that can spread quickly.