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can you reuse weed seeds

People love their weed plants, so they think giving them more must be a good thing. But alas, it’s not. Overfeeding can lead to nutrient burn, or worse, nutrient lockout caused by accumulated minerals in the soil. In this case, you’ll need to flush your soil with water and start again with your feedings to return the pH to an ideal window. In short: don’t overdo it on the nutes!

If you’re growing outdoors, air circulation shouldn’t be a problem; but then, there are other things to watch out for. For one, you’ll want to protect your plants from thieves. You can do so by planting companion species to hide your crop and mask the smell. You can also select cannabis strains that naturally remain short and hidden from view. Find out more about stealthy outdoor grows in our blog on how to protect your cannabis plants from thieves.

There are several methods for germinating cannabis seeds. Although none is really “better” than the other, we do recommend germinating directly in soil, or even better, using the RQS Starter Kit. This does away with the risky part of transferring sprouted seeds and possibly damaging them.

8. NOT HAVING PROPER VENTILATION

If the pot is too small, the growth of your roots, and therefore the growth of your entire plant, will be restricted. If the pot is too big, this increases the likelihood of overwatering, fungus, and root rot.

Monitoring pH is important since cannabis can only uptake nutrients within a relatively small window. If the pH level is too low or too high, your plants will get sick.

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Fill a glass halfway with lukewarm (22°C) water and drop in your seeds. After about 3–5 days, the seeds should have sprouted, and you can now transfer them (carefully!) into your prepared soil pots.

Using the right containers for your weed might not seem like a big deal, but you’d be surprised just how crucial this variable is. Here are some factors you should consider:

1. How do you end up with extra cannabis seeds?
2. 5 ways to make the most of leftover cannabis seeds
2a. Experiment with different growing setups
2b. Turn spare seeds into a tasty snack
2c. Animals love them too
2d. Sell them, or pass them on to friends
2e. Start your own private seed bank

• Nutritional stress: Caused by excessively high or low concentrations, incorrect pH, wrong nutrients for the growing stage.

HOW DO YOU END UP WITH EXTRA CANNABIS SEEDS?

• Water stress: Caused by poor water quality, excess or lack of water, incorrect pH, incorrect water temperature.

This is perhaps the most ambitious pursuit you can try with your spare seeds: breeding. It involves patience and precision in noting the characteristics of different cannabis strains and their associated seeds. With time, you will have a great collection of genetics that you can cross, keep as mother plants, etc. And if you start with mystery seeds, well, go back to our first suggestion: Use them to experiment and expand your repertoire as a grower!

Sourcing certified seeds from a reputable seed bank is by far the best option, and if you turn to the street to buy and sell seeds, it’s pretty much a no man’s land in terms of quality and legality. Local regulations may vary, and one should always exercise caution herein. Another—possibly safer—option is to pass your leftover seeds on to your friends, without involving money in the matter. This, alongside transparency about where you sourced your seeds, can make for a great way to inspire someone to start their own cannabis growing journey.

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