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can steams and seeds from weed make you sterile

Cannabutter is always good to have since it is very versatile ingredient with which you can make a plethora of cannabis recipes. Most recipes for cannabutter will possibly say, that you use weed shake or buds to make it, but of course you can use your stems as well! Just ensure that you use plenty of them to get the desired effectiveness because the stems are weaker than if you were to use buds.

Anyone who grows marijuana knows the feeling: You may get a good amount of bud at harvest time, but as you are cutting your plant you will toss much of it, like the leaves and the stems. What a waste! But don’t fret: Cannabis is very versatile and you can put the stems to good use as we’ll show you in this article.

To make cannabutter, you need to grind up your stems. Since you will likely need a whole lot of stems for your butter it can be best if you use a food processor for this. Once you have ground your stems, put them in a saucepan with some butter and simmer them for about 45 minutes. Make sure you stir frequently. You can turn off the heat once your stems have turned brown. Use a strainer and strain the melted butter to filter out the remaining plant matter. You can store your cannabutter in the fridge.

USE THE STEMS TO MAKE CANNABUTTER

Unless someone lives under a rock, most people today (and this includes scientists and health experts) agree, that cannabis has outstanding therapeutic potential. Topical cannabis ointments and creams make an excellent way to use the plant for medicinal purposes, to help with the treatment of many different ailments and for pain relief.

It probably comes as no surprise that, yes, by planting seeds found in shake, it is possible to grow marijuana plants. While this seems like an attractive idea in theory, what many stoners don’t realize is the time and effort that goes into cultivating reefer. Especially if you’re living in New York, as a college student, there’s nowhere in the city a plant would have access to proper soil and enough sunlight to prosper — this, of course, is a lot for any smoker. Despite the fact that potheads aren’t of the most responsible breed, if your weed is shitty in the first place, why would you even want to reproduce it?

Of course, there are many other ways to deal with pesky stems and seeds that are possibly more affective and slightly more reasonable than stem tea and planting seeds. Green Dragon, for example, is a notorious weed, stem, and seed concoction that MythPuffers will be investigating in the coming weeks — so stay tuned.

You don’t need a lot of things to make your own cannabis topical at home. On the internet, you can find a good number of easy recipes for basic marijuana topicals where you can use your stems to make them. You can then add essential oils or vitamins, that with their beneficial properties work greatly together with the therapeutically compounds of the cannabis!

Some studies on the effect of cannabis use on male fertility have indicated that regular use may reduce spermatogenesis (the production of sperm in the testes) and testosterone levels.

In 2012, the American Society of Andrology published a review of research on the effects of illicit drug use on male fertility. The researchers found that in the majority of studies, it was consistently concluded that cannabis use had a negative impact on male reproductive physiology.

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Other studies seen as providing evidence that cannabis use can cause foetal abnormalities are animal studies (Geber & Schramm 1969, Phillipset al, 1971) in which rabbits, hamsters, rats and mice were injected with vast doses of crude cannabis extract (as much as 666mg/kg in one instance!). Such massive doses of cannabis would be practically impossible for a human to consume through conventional means, and are essentially useless as a point of comparison.

And an even earlier study (Kolodny et al, 1974) into testosterone levels in “chronic” cannabis users found that 6 of 17 subjects had oligospermia (low sperm count), and that average testosterone levels in the cannabis-using group were just over half that of the control group. The effect of cannabis on testosterone levels was observed to be dose-dependent.

Although THC and anandamide are both agonists of the CB1-receptors, they greatly differ in structure and therefore have different effects on certain metabolic processes. Anandamide has a much shorter half-life than THC (just a few minutes for anandamide compared to as long as 24 hours for THC). So while anandamide will degrade shortly after it contacts a receptor, THC can remain in nearby adipose tissue for much longer periods, and can continue to stimulate the receptors, ultimately causing overstimulation and potential negative effects.