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can sniffer dogs smell weed seeds

What can police sniffer dogs smell? Most sniffer dogs can be trained to pick up the smell of marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, opiates, ecstasy and LSD.

Can drug dogs tell if your high? The problem is, the dogs are exceptionally sensitive to the scent of drugs, so much so, they are able to pick up minute traces of residual drugs, which could indicate any number of scenarios – perhaps previous use of drugs by a person, or even just that someone has touched drugs, or drug equipment, or a hand of another …

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The problem is, the dogs are exceptionally sensitive to the scent of drugs, so much so, they are able to pick up minute traces of residual drugs, which could indicate any number of scenarios – perhaps previous use of drugs by a person, or even just that someone has touched drugs, or drug equipment, or a hand of another …

Most sniffer dogs can be trained to pick up the smell of marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, opiates, ecstasy and LSD.

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Based on this list, we can still expect to see drug-sniffing dogs in the line of police work, except when it comes to marijuana in certain states. In theory, police dogs will be used to sniff out the remaining six drugs that are illegal in all 50 states and Canada. That all makes sense, but what happens when a police dog smells something, points you out, and now you’re forced to reveal what’s in your pockets to the cops. Will it remain legal to strip search someone if they claim they’re only carrying marijuana? And is it legal to do so?

Firstly, the references to drugs are pretty vague. You wouldn’t put marijuana and heroin in the same drug category even though it’s all relative to a dog. According to canine website Cuteness, drug-sniffing dogs are trained to put up on seven variations

Messages, Tips, and Lessons from Law Enforcement

To better understand this potentially messy situation, let’s see what Sgt. Tom Bechthold from the Edmonton Police Canine Department has to say. “To train on something that we knew was just a matter of time before it was legal just doesn’t make any sense to us,” he told The Star, referring to marijuana. Now, he predicts the 14 police dogs on his force will be out of a job. The Edmonton police canine units conduct roughly 40 drug searches each year, but as of 2018 (the year marijuana became legal in Canada), they only conducted 28 searches. Thanks for the info, Tom!

Here’s what professor Penny has to say. “If what [the dogs] are smelling is a product that people are legally entitled to possess, then that raises the question of whether the police would then have grounds to obtain a warrant to open the container or conduct a search of the location.” In his eyes, the next step is taking this dilemma to court.

There are one of two options, here. One, find a place for the dogs to continue working. Two, let them retire and live a life of leisure. Now that doesn’t sound so bad, does it? If humans love retirement, so can dogs. Maybe we’ll start seeing former drug-sniffing dogs in pounds and rescue centers ready to be adopted by a loving family. I mean, that kind of sounds like heaven.