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can eating weed seeds make you high

You can detect a beany flavor resulting from a combination of bell pepper-like, green, and woody molecules. You can pair it confidently with kaki, plantain, jasmine flower, tucupi, adzuki bean, pandan leaf, cucumbers, green peas, carrots or Indian Pale Ale.

The hemp plant is taller and thinner than the stalky marijuana plant. The main difference between the two is the production of the psychoactive compound – tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Hemp contains less than 0.3% THC, while the marijuana can be anywhere from 5% to 30% THC. Therefore, it is safe to incorporate hemp seeds into your diet. It has been a staple for many years but recently began gaining global popularity. Additionally, it is regarded as a superfood, thanks to a large number of benefits for your health.

Hemp seeds are pure delight for nut aficionados. Nutty pyrazines and pyrroline, also found in coffee, dark chocolate, nut pralines, nuts, sprouted chickpea, and Parmigiano Reggiano, are responsible for the seed’s nutty flavor. Hemp seed is therefore a perfect ingredient for a fluffy mousse or a heavy brownie. You can even smell a resinous pine nut-like undertone. It is the effect of combination of the nutty molecules with woody, spicy / camphoreous, and green notes.

Comforting fatty aftertaste

Hemp seeds feature a well-rounded fatty mouthfeel. It is the favour of different acids and aldehydes, especially (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, that give extra citrusy undertones like what can be found in lime peel, lemon and kaffir lime leaves. It is present in popcorn, pumpkin seeds, and peanut oil, green olive, cooked bulgur, and stewed beef gravy as well.

The simplest way to eat hemp seeds is to enjoy them raw in smoothies, granola, porridge, yoghurt or sauces for some added crunchiness. You can also enrich your baked goods with hemp seeds. Hemp ‘milk’ is another way to easily incorporate the nutritious seeds into your diet, and the same goes for hemp flour. As the seeds are rich in fatty acids, cold pressed hemp seeds oil is an up-and-coming product.

There is a mistaken belief that you can get high by eating hemp seeds. Indeed, hemp and marijuana belong to the same plant species (Cannabis Sativa L), but they are different strains. Hemp produces not only nutty, fatty, buttery tasting seeds, but also can it be refined into paper, textiles and clothing, biodegradable plastic (cutlery, cups, tableware), biofuel, and even construction material (hempcrete). Yes, you can build a house with it!

There’s also a subtle hint of maple and caramel aromas, which can be linked to the semi-sweet taste of the hemp seeds

Ask any well-established nutritionist, and chances are you will hear that proteins derived from plants are a lot healthier and even easier to digest than the regular animal-based variety. In fact, data revealed in a recent study where health records of over 130,000 people in a span of 30 years were examined; it was discovered that participants who did not consume any animal protein had noticeably lower death rates than regular meat-eating participants; that where there was an increase in every 3% caloric intake from plant protein, death risk was effectively cut down by 10%.

When you take just some of the benefits into consideration, it’s easy to understand why consuming cannabis seeds on a regular basis can be an excellent way to prevent certain diseases, and promote whole body wellness as well as general health.

No High – But a World of Health Benefits

Obese people can benefit from consuming seeds because they contain lots of vitamins, including Vitamin E, and essential minerals such as magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc and calcium – nutrients that can help overweight people stay fuller and feel more satiated around the clock.

So, if you can’t get high from seeds alone and there are no therapeutic benefits, then what are we left with? This shouldn’t stop you from making those seeds a part of your daily nutritional regimen. Let’s expand on that:

Abundant source of easily digestible, natural protein