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avoid moving weed seeds

Weeds compete with grass and garden plants for space, light, water and soil nutrients. Not only do they look bad and have the ability to take over quickly, they’re also the perfect hosts for disease and insects. Before you know it, one weed can turn into many little thieves robbing your plants of their health.

If you’re looking for how to stop weeds from growing in the first place, consider a chemical option. Pre-emergent herbicides stop weed seeds from germinating. They’re tailored to target specific combinations of weeds or weed families. Simply apply the pre-emergent to your garden before the weed seeds begin to germinate – in early spring or after cultivating. Pre-emergent is activated by water, so after treating the area, be sure to give it a good soak with Gilmour’s EZ Click Control Watering Nozzle set on the garden setting. The water application draws the herbicide down to the seed level for the best results.

How to Prevent Weeds

    Cultivate with Caution

The best way to prevent weeds from spreading throughout your garden is to stop them before they take root. Knowing how to prevent weeds means understanding the task is not a one-time job, but rather a continual garden chore. But even those who pull weeds begrudgingly do so knowing that preventing weeds as they appear, or quickly after they’ve sprouted, takes a lot less time than removing an established weed infestation. Consider taking the following steps for a weed free gardening experience.

When’s the best time to pull a weed? Yesterday. When’s the second best time? Now.
It’s an old joke, but there’s actually a lot of truth to it – the earlier you eliminate a weed, the less of a chance there is for it to multiply and take over the entire garden.

People love their weed plants, so they think giving them more must be a good thing. But alas, it’s not. Overfeeding can lead to nutrient burn, or worse, nutrient lockout caused by accumulated minerals in the soil. In this case, you’ll need to flush your soil with water and start again with your feedings to return the pH to an ideal window. In short: don’t overdo it on the nutes!

Monitoring pH is important since cannabis can only uptake nutrients within a relatively small window. If the pH level is too low or too high, your plants will get sick.

If you’re growing outdoors, air circulation shouldn’t be a problem; but then, there are other things to watch out for. For one, you’ll want to protect your plants from thieves. You can do so by planting companion species to hide your crop and mask the smell. You can also select cannabis strains that naturally remain short and hidden from view. Find out more about stealthy outdoor grows in our blog on how to protect your cannabis plants from thieves.

8. NOT HAVING PROPER VENTILATION

Your planting pots need to provide good drainage. Usually, there will already be holes in the bottom. If there are no holes, as can happen when you buy standard plastic pots, you will have to make them yourself. Make sure there are at least 5 openings, each about the size of a penny. As long as soil doesn’t just fall through the bottom, you’re good.

Are you growing cannabis for the first time? Or maybe you’re more experienced but keep encountering growing issues? Let us help you! Before you put seeds in the soil, check out the points below. Once you learn the 11 biggest mistakes you can make when growing cannabis, you’ll be more than ready to grow healthy and successful plants.

For this reason, growers must provide the right amount of light for their plants. Too little, and the growth and yields of your plants will suffer. Too much, and photoperiod strains won’t flower (plus, your energy bill will spike if you’re growing indoors).

Seedlings are very sensitive and do not take kindly to growing mistakes like improper humidity and moisture levels. Both could spell the premature end for your seedlings.