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are burnt weed seeds ok for parrot

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Maple Originally, this page only listed two maple trees: vine maple as safe, and red maple as potentially harmful. I’ve included "maple" in the safe list now, but with this condition: remove the bark . It may not be absolutely neccessary, but its the only way that I’ll suggest most of that tree genus. From what I’ve read, the bark of many maple trees, like vine maple or Japanese maple, etc., is fine. Meaning, the bark in itself is not deemed a problem. But red maple (Acer rubrum) can harbor a fungus. Inhalation of exuded residue may be harmful. Maple wood – in general – should be safe for natural wood bird perches once bark is removed. One source wrote that "red maple" is bad for horses, not really specifying why. Currently, I’d use almost any maple branch for a bird toy or perch..

Few things are added to this page beside wood and branches. But we experienced a problem with new vinyl flooring that seemed worth sharing. We decided to give them an entire small bedroom downstairs for an aviary. And laid about 10′ x 11′ of brand new vinyl flooring. No adhesives used. In the afternoon, we put the birds in the room for a couple of hours to get used to the space. I went down to check on them, and the male Green Cheek Conure was having trouble breathing and was leaning back hard on a branch. The female was in the cage also having problems breathing. I immediately took them upstairs. Anyway, in about 1/2 hour, they were in very good shape, back to themselves again. My best estimate, is that another 30 minutes in the room, would have been the end of at least one bird. We knew the stuff a smell to it, but never realized that it was hazardous to them. Just thought of it a a new product smell. I could not find anything online either.

Bad wood – left column

"The willow family includes a number of different species . . Some of the more commonly known are white willow/European willow (Salix alba), black willow/pussy willow (Salix nigra), crack willow (Salix fragilis), purple willow (Salix purpurea), and weeping willow (Salix babylonica). The willow bark sold in Europe and the United States usually includes a combination of the bark from white, purple, and crack willows"

For starters, selecting a cage that is the biggest you can afford, then maybe double it. It will be a home. When we doubled or tripled cage size for our birds, improved behavior was immediate. A few cubic feet separate a bird cage home from just a mere confine. This is not a wood safety thing. But I want to open the page with this first, because I get disgusted about people stuffing pet birds into the small cages. If you can’t afford to be generous, find the animal a new home, or do not get one in the first place.

Photinia In May 2010, someone told me that Photonia leaves have Arsenic in them, and was toxic to horses. The only reference I could find online was a New Zealand Alpaca site with a table listing Photinia leaves as toxic with Arsenic. But no other references. Then I found a website of a Manes and Tails Organization, which included excerpts from The Merck Veterinarian Manual: Poisonous Range Plants of Temperate North America. The notes stated: Cyanogenic glycosides in foliage and fruits, hydrolyzed in GI tract to free cyanide, thereby affecting cellular respiration.